Disney+ To Revive ‘Home Alone’, ‘Night At The Museum’, More As Part Of Fox Reset

Disney’s Bob Iger said during the company’s call Tuesday to discuss its third-quarter earnings that its Disney+ streaming service will eventually include reboots of four franchises from its newly acquired Fox movie library. He called out Home Alone, Night At the Museum, Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Cheaper By the Dozen.

It is unclear what form the reboots would take, or when they might appear on the streaming service, which launches November 12. Iger said only that they will be “reimagined” for “a new generation.”

In addition to Avatar, Planet of the Apes, X-Men and Deadpool, “we’re also focused on leveraging Fox’s vast library of great titles to further enrich the content mix on our DTC platforms [Disney+ and Hulu],” he said.

Disney previously announced that one of its own family film franchises, its iconic Lady and the Tramp, will get a live-action/CG hybrid update for its streaming service, with Tessa Thompson voicing Lady and Justin Theroux as Tramp.

By the end of the first year of launch, Disney+ overall will house more than 7,500 episodes of TV and 400 movies. Starting this year, the first streaming window for most films will be on Disney platforms rather than Netflix.

During today’s call, Iger said Alan Horn and Alan Bergman are “redefining” the Fox film efforts to ensure the “same standards and the same creative discipline” are in place. He said Disney is taking Fox in “a whole new direction,” with an “all-new development slate” of titles for theatrical release as well as Hulu and Disney+.

“We see great long-term value in the broad collection of theatrical IP we acquired from Fox,” Iger said.

Emma Watts recently signed a new deal to stay on at Disney, transitioning from Fox. Iger said Horn and Bergman and their group have been working with Watts. The first goal, he said, is “to cut back on the number of releases, and then to focus on the kind of release we would hope would come out of this studio.”

Iger predicted it will likely take “a good, solid year or two years before we can have an impact. … But we’re all confident that we’re going to be able to turn around the fortunes of Fox live action.”