NBC morning news show host Megyn Kelly described the Senate hearings in which Dr. Christine Blasey Ford brought her sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh a “farce.”

The former litigator said the hours-long process wasn’t about getting to the truth. It lacked the checks and balances of true judicial process.

“The whole thing was a farce. It was set up to be a farce,” Kelly said during a panel session today at Fortune’s Most Powerful Women Summit. “There was no impartial arbiter in that Senate hearing room.”

Kelly said the proceeding wasn’t about getting to the truth, but rather deciding whether to confirm Kavanaugh to a lifetime Supreme Court appointment. The judge was denied due process and Ford was unlikely to be believed by most Republicans, Kelly said.

“It’s going to be utterly unsatisfactory,” Kelly said.

Earlier this week, Kelly fired off a series of tweets in which she challenged the credibility of Julie Swetnick, the third woman to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct. The attack prompted backlash online from some who accused Kelly of victim-shaming.

“The notion that *every* woman must be believed is absurd,” Kelly wrote in a series of tweets Monday night. “Just ask the 3 Duke lax players who were falsely accused of rape by a woman who virtually all of the media believed but who made the whole thing up.”

Kelly, a former corporate litigator, has been chipping away at Swetnick on the air, and on social media. The Hill reported she devoted a large portion of Megyn Kelly Today to the woman who claims she witnessed Kavanaugh in high school attempting to get teenage girls “inebriated and disoriented so they could then be ‘gang raped.'”

During a discussion, Kelly cited an OregonLive.com report that Swetnick was accused of lying about her education and work experience at a Portland tech company. Online, she surfaced an Associated Press report of a personal injury complaint she filed against the Washington Area Transit Authority, in which she claimed she lost modeling work to an employer who turned out to be a friend.

In one particularly pointed post directed at the woman’s attorney, Michael Avenatti, Kelly observed, “The mvmt doesn’t shield accusers from tough Qs,” Kelly posted. “Most women tell the truth, but not all do.”