Endeavor Content is lining up more non-English language premium dramas to expand on Damien Chazelle’s Netflix series The Eddy after a “phenomenal” Mipcom.

The company, which is run by Co-Presidents Chris Rice and Graham Taylor, is currently working on the eight-part musical series, which is being shot in French, English and Arabic. Rice told Deadline that it is now planning more non-English projects. “We couldn’t be more excited about the new partnerships we have been building in Europe and the rest of the world on premium non-English language shows – this is an expansion from our Damien Chazelle series The Eddy,” he said.

Rice said that Endeavor Content was buoyed by last week’s international TV sales event Mipcom after debuting its “best slate yet”. He said that it had a “great response from international networks” to its catalogue of shows including AMC’s John Le Carre spy thriller The Little Drummer Girl (above), which stars Florence Pugh, Alexander Skarsgard and Michael Shannon, Hulu’s Beau Willimon space drama The First, which stars Sean Penn and Natasha McElhone and Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s breakout BBC America drama Killing Eve, starring Sandra Oh and Jodie Comer.

It also launched sales on short-form series State of the Union, a 10 x 10-minute series from Nick Hornby and Stephen Frears. The show, which is produced by The King’s Speech indie See-Saw Films, stars Rosamund Pike and Chris O’Dowd as a couple who meet in the pub immediately after their weekly marital therapy session. Rice said it was a “new type of show for us”.

“We focus on an ultra-high-quality and low-volume slate, ensuring that each project can be sold in a bespoke way and partnered with the right networks internationally,” he said.

Rice added, “We have several exciting sales in the U.S. with incredible talent that we are finalizing now and will be announced in the next few weeks.”

In addition to global sales, Endeavor had a busy week with boss Ari Emanuel in town to pick up an award and give a keynote speech. The CEO revealed that the company was looking to make a number of acquisitions in the content world, taking advantage of other major media companies being tied up with other deals. “There’s more acquisitions that we want to make. With Disney, Comcast and AT&T having to take 18 months to absorb those acquisitions, we see a pretty robust roadmap if we were to make some more acquisitions that are interesting to us. We’re looking at stuff right now,” he said.

Rice added that the changing nature of the global TV business was a hot topic of conversation in Cannes last week. “The expected effects of the consolidation happening among major media companies, especially the opportunities those moves will create [was the trend of the market],” he said.