Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh admits that he may have been too emotional during his Senate Judiciary Committee testimony to refute charges brought by Christine Blasey Ford.

Writing in an op-ed today in the Wall Street Journal, the embattled Kavanaugh said, “I was very emotional last Thursday, more so than I have ever been. I might have been too emotional at times. I know that my tone was sharp, and I said a few things I should not have said. I hope everyone can understand that I was there as a son, husband and dad. I testified with five people foremost in my mind: my mom, my dad, my wife, and most of all my daughters.”

Kavanaugh explained that he met with “65 senators and explained my approach to the law. I participated in more than 30 hours of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and I submitted written answers to nearly 1,300 additional questions.”

However, he said, all of those meetings resulted in him being confronted with “wrongful and sometimes vicious allegations. My time in high school and college, more than 30 years ago, has been ridiculously distorted. My wife and daughters have faced vile and violent threats.”

He noted that his subsequent rebuttal was “forceful and passionate. That is because I forcefully and passionately denied the allegation against me. At times, my testimony—both in my opening statement and in response to questions—reflected my overwhelming frustration at being wrongly accused, without corroboration, of horrible conduct completely contrary to my record and character. My statement and answers also reflected my deep distress at the unfairness of how this allegation has been handled.”

Kavanaugh, whose 7th FBI investigation is now wrapped, is expected to have his final confirmation vote in the Senate this weekend. He concluded his op-ed by promising to be a non-partisan judge.

“Going forward, you can count on me to be the same kind of judge and person I have been for my entire 28-year legal career: hardworking, even-keeled, open-minded, independent and dedicated to the Constitution and the public good.”