The EU is readying a quota to ensure Netflix, Amazon and other streamers operating in the European Union have at least 30% local content in their on-demand catalogs. This 30% quota of European works was first set out and announced by the Commission in April and an EU Commission spokesperson has confirmed to us today that it could become law by the end of this year. Variety was first to report that the law could come into effect by year’s end.

Netflix

Here in Venice, CICAE, the International Confederation of Art Cinemas, has criticized the festival’s decision to screen films backed by Netflix in its Competition. Alfonso Cuaron’s Roma, the Coen brothers’ The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs and Paul Greengrass’ terror drama 22 July are among Netflix’s movies in Competition. In a statement, CICAE called on Venice Film Festival director Alberto Barbera to keep competition slots for “works of art that will be seen in cinemas internationally.”

“Earlier this year, Thierry Fremaux, director of the Cannes Film Festival, set an example and took the side of art cinemas and decided to exclude films without a theatrical release in France from competition,” the film body said in the statement. “A prestigious film festival allowing in its official selection lineup titles that will not be seen on the big screen internationally encourages practices that endanger an important sector of the film industry. Cinema and television are different mediums, and cinematic films are made to be seen according to high-quality standards on the big screen.”

Meanwhile, some 165 leading screenwriters and directors, including Jacques Audiard, Paolo Sorrentino, Mike Leigh, Agnieszka Holland, Lone Scherfig, Matteo Garrone, Lázló Nemes and Pawel Pawlikowski, have signed a petition calling on the European Parliament to adopt the the latest version of the EU Copyright Directive. The declaration, revealed today in Venice, is backed by the Federation of European Film Directors, The Federation of Screenwriters and the Society of Audiovisual Authors. The petition states, “Together, we have been calling on the European institutions to adopt a Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market that introduces an unwaivable right to proportionate remuneration for authors, collected directly from the on-demand platforms by the collective management organisations representing us, the authors.” An EU vote on the directive will take place on September 12 after a previous version of the proposal was rejected by the EU Parliament.