Lifetime has set its fall movie lineup with seven young adult-focused films that tackle topics such as mental health, suicide and teen domestic dating violence, with Shannen Doherty, Mira Sorvino, Bella Thorne, Austin P. Mckenzie, Angela Kinsey Jason Patric and Caitlin Stasey among the cast. The Girl in the Bathtub; Terror in the Woods; Conrad & Michelle: If Words Could Kill; No One Would Tell; Believe Me: The Lisa McVey Story and The Lover in the Attic, join previously announced The Bad Seed, directed by and starring Rob Lowe, which premieres September 9 at 8 PM.

No One Would Tell is a remake of the 1996 cautionary teen dating movie. It stars Shannen Doherty stars as a mother who must fight for justice for her daughter against her seemingly perfect boyfriend. Mira Sorvino also stars. It premieres September 16.

Lifetime

Inspired by a true story, Conrad and Michelle: If Words Could Kill reveals the tragic tale of Conrad Roy (Austin P. McKenzie) who was encouraged to commit suicide via text messages from his girlfriend, Michelle Carter (Bella Thorne). It premieres September 23.

From the executive producers of Girl in the Box and Girl in the Bunker, Believe Me, premiering September 30, is the true story of Lisa McVey (Katie Douglas), who was abducted and able to escape her captor, only to have police and family question the validity of her claims.

The Girl in the Bathtub, set for October 7, is inspired by the true story of Julia Law (Caitlin Stasey) who was found dead in the bathtub of her 58-year-old boyfriend, Chuck Perturo Jr (Jason Patric) in Philadelphia.

Executive produced by Christina Ricci, Terror in the Woods, which premieres October 14, is inspired by a true story. Starring Angela Kinsey, it follows the story of two twelve-year-old girls who attack their friend as a sacrifice to an internet legend, the Suzerain, leading to a larger question about mental health issues for young children.

Complete descriptions of all newly-announced movies follow below.

Lifetime

No One Would Tell — In an update of the 1996 made-for-television movie, No One Would Tell explores physical and emotional abuse in teen relationships. Laura Collins (Shannen Doherty), single mom to daughter Sarah (Matreya Scarrwener), has had a history of rocky relationships, so when Sarah begins dating the popular and charismatic Rob Tennison (Callan Potter), Laura is thrilled with what she sees. But when it becomes increasingly clear that Rob has a darker, possessive side, Laura lives in a state of denial about her daughter’s relationship until Sarah goes missing. Laura must find the will to fight for justice for Sarah when a case against Rob is brought to trial and presided over by a powerful judge (Mira Sorvino).

Danielle von Zerneck, Lisa Richardson and Martin Fisher serve as executive producers with Shawn Angelski and Paddy Bickerton serving as producers on the film. Gail Harvey directs from a script written by Caitlin D. Fryers.

Conrad & Michelle: If Words Could Kill — Based on real-life events, court testimonies and authentic texts, Conrad & Michelle: If Words Could Kill, follows the turbulent tragic teen romance of Michelle Carter (Bella Thorne) and Conrad Roy (Austin P. Mckenzie) that shocked the nation.

During a family vacation, Conrad, a loner with social anxiety, finds solace with Michelle, who has issues of her own. Both with suicidal tendencies, they turn to each other for support. Despite living in nearby cities, the two communicate mainly via text messages, sharing a toxic relationship of dependency. But when Conrad expresses his desire to end his life to escape his sadness this time, instead of trying to stop him as she had previously, Michelle encourages Conrad to take his life, even providing him suggestions on how to do it. Conrad tragically carries through with his plan, leading the nation to question the power of technology and if texting can be blamed for suicide. Ultimately, the judge hands down a guilty verdict, a first of its kind in which someone is convicted of manslaughter for using his or her words.

Conrad & Michelle: If Words Could Kill is produced by Peace Out Productions, with Judith Verno executive producing. Stephen Tolkin is the writer and director. The film is distributed by Sony Pictures Television.

Lifetime is also providing suicide prevention resources from National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and Crisis Text Line.

Lifetime

Believe Me: The Lisa McVey Story — From the producers behind Girl in the Box and Girl in the Bunker, comes the disturbing true-story of Lisa McVey, who was abducted in 1984 but later released by her abuser, only to have people question her story.

ln early hours of November 3, 17-year-old Lisa McVey rode her bike home after working a double shift. Earlier that night, she’d written a note, contemplating her life after years of sexual abuse by a family member. But suddenly, she finds herself in a fight to stay alive when she is abducted. In order to survive, Lisa develops a relationship with her captor, using reverse psychology to orchestrate her eventual release. Once Lisa is safely home, she discovers police and even her own family refuse to believe her. It’s only when a veteran detective hears the details of her story that Lisa finally finds someone she can open up to. As they piece together her story, they realize that her abductor is the notorious serial killer that the Tampa PD is hotly pursuing. Since Lisa left a trail of clues, the police are on his trail, but will they find him before he strikes again?

Believe Me: The Lisa McVey Story stars Katie Douglas, David James Elliott and Rossif Sutherland and is executive produced by Charles Tremayne and Jeff Vanderwal for Cineflix (Believe Me) Inc. Jim Donovan directs from a script by Christina Welsh.

The Girl in the Bathtub — The dark, psychological drama The Girl in the Bathtub is inspired by the true story of Julia Law (Caitlin Stasey), a young paralegal struggling with issues of addiction, found dead in her boss’s bathtub in Philadelphia just shy of her 27th birthday. Her boss, a prominent Philadelphia lawyer (played by Jason Patric) whom she had recently begun dating, was interviewed by authorities as they investigated Julia’s death. But it is soon revealed her boss was just one of three lovers Julia had—raising questions about whether any of them may have had a motive to kill her. So the question remains – who killed Julia Law?

The Girl in the Bathtub is produced by Sony Pictures Television and The Sokolow Company with Diane Sokolow, Rachael Verno and Karen Moncrieff executive producing. Moncrieff is also the writer and director.

Lifetime

Terror in the Woods — Inspired by true events, Rachel (Ella West Jerrier) and Kaitlyn (SophieGrace McCarthy) are two quiet, shy 12-year-old best friends in small town Georgia. Like many 12 year-olds, they liked having sleepovers and spent much of their time on the internet often looking up scary stories. Their favorite internet spooky story is that of the Suzerain, a clawed monster who lures children to his palace in the forest. To their parents, it seemed like a harmless ghost story, but in reality, the girls believed the Suzerain was real and that he would hurt their families unless they did what he told them to, which was perform a blood sacrifice. Together, they settle on their friend Emily (Skylar Morgan Jones) as their target, stabbing her with a pair of scissors. Miraculously, Emily survives the brutal attack, and Rachel and Kaitlyn are picked up by the police. As the investigation begins, bigger questions about use of the internet and the state of the girls mental health come to the forefront. Had Kaitlyn’s parents Dani (Angela Kinsey, The Office) and Nathan (Drew Powell, Gotham), and Rachel’s mom Jackie (Carrie Hood, Devious Maids), been aware of the extent of the girls fascination with the Suzerain? Should the ultimate blame be placed on the dark side of the internet or the deeper issue of mental health? Or was there nothing that could stop the hold that Suzerain had over Rachel and Kaitlyn.

Terror in the Woods is produced by Thinkfactory Media in association with Swirl Films for Lifetime Television. Executive producers are Leslie Greif, Christina Ricci, and James Heerdegen. Produced by Eric Tomosunas. D.J. Viola directs from a script written by Amber Benson.

The Lover in the Attic: A True Story — Set in the 1930’s, Dolly (Molly Burnett, Days of Our Lives) lived a seemingly perfect life with her husband Fred (David Fierro, The Knick), until she met and seduced their repairman, Otto (Kevin Fonteyne, Sun Records). As Dolly and Otto’s affair intensifies, she secretly moves him into the attic so she could have him whenever she pleased. One night during a heated argument between Dolly and her husband, Otto bursts downstairs from the attic and kills Fred. Now the two star-crossed lovers must cover up the murder, but will they be able to keep their secret?

The Lover in the Attic: A True Story is produced by ThinkFactory Media. Leslie Greif, Alexander Kerr, and Joanne Rubino executive produce. Produced by Eric Tomosunas. Melora Walters serves as director and Richard Kletter and Michele Samit as writers.