David Nevins, president and CEO of Showtime, will receive the top award (and the good-natured roasting that often comes with it) at the annual luncheon benefiting the Center for Communications.

The organization, founded in 1980 by CBS icon Frank Stanton, has an educational mission to further opportunities for the next generation of media professionals and bridge the gap between academia and industry. In order to raise funds for its programs, it holds a yearly lunch event at the Pierre Hotel.

Recent recipients of the not-for-profit group’s award for excellence, which is named for Stanton, have included Shane Smith of Vice, former mayor and media exec Michael Bloomberg, and Ted Turner. The honoree often draws tributes and zingers from notable guests. AMC Networks CEO Josh Sapan’s retinue included Fred Armisen and the late Joan Rivers; Smith’s award came with remarks from former Viacom CEO Tom Freston and Johnny Knoxville.

Nevins, who headed programming at Showtime for several years, officially took the mantle of CEO in January 2016. He has steered original series such as Billions, Patrick Melrose, The Chi and the rebooted Twin Peaks, and his first green-light was the long-running Homeland.

Before Showtime, Nevins was president of Imagine Television from 2002 to 2010, where he oversaw development, production and was executive producer on all Imagine shows. Under Nevins, Imagine produced the Emmy-winning Arrested Development and 24, and also developed and executive produced series such as Parenthood and Friday Night Lights. Before Imagine, Nevins held senior programming positions at Fox Broadcasting Co. and NBC.

“Under David’s leadership Showtime has become a premier destination for first-rate programming that resonates with audiences everywhere,” said Center for Communication Chairman David J. Barrett.  “We are so thrilled to honor such a talented executive who embodies the Center’s commitment to diversity and quality in all genres. From drama to comedy to documentary, under David’s guidance, Showtime has it all.”