Netflix’s new Chuck Lorre comedy The Kominsky Method began as a spec script written by the king of broadcast comedy, about an actor turned acting coach named Sandy Kominsky, played by Michael Douglas, whose long-suffering agent Norman, played by Alan Arkin, is his best friend.

“We talk a lot about prostates on the show,” Lorre told TV critics at TCA.

“The show began with my desire to write about what I’m living. Ageing, the decay of the flesh…..It has to be funny; otherwise it’s heartbreaking…the loss of loved ones and how you respond to a culture that feels like it’s moving away from you,” the 60-something industry bigwig said.

“That was the impetus of the show, to do all that and hopefully have some comedy involved.”

Lorre said he did not even try to take the concept to broadcast TV. “I wanted the opportunity to tell the story in the Netflix universe, with no commercial breaks and no time constraints. You have no idea what a joy it is to not worry if it

is too long and you ave to cut things you really care about.”

The Kominsky Method pilot came in at a whopping 32 minute – a full 10 minutes too long for a broadcast sitcom.

Lorre insisted he still loves the four-camera comedy format shot in front of an audience in a studio. “It’s a really quick process,” he explained, whereas this “process of making a small movie very week is a lot slower.”

“I’ve been doing the other thing for long time and I’ve come to love it and I do appreciate getting a audience to truly laugh – not a mercy laugh, not a chuckle but a real laugh – is a wonderful thing to get done.”

After the Q&A, Lorre got asked if he is writing this coming season of The Big Bang Theory as its last, answering, “That’s a question we ask a lot around the old office. I don’t know.”

During his Kominsky Method Q&A, Lorre agreed with a reporter who suggested he was working with two legends on his Netflix project. “I got to watch two masters at their craft up close ever day and learn. What a gift that is to go to work every morning and learn stuff you don’t know at this point in my life.”