Chuck Lorre came to TCA to plug his new Netflix comedy The Kominsky Project, but got asked about New Yorker’s blockbuster Friday piece in which six women alleged their careers suffered when they rebuffed unwanted advances of CBS Corp CEO Leslie Moonves.

Lorre, the king of broadcast comedy, has three hit comedies at CBS, including the country’s No. 1 sitcom The Big Bang Theory, its spinoff Young Sheldon, as well as Mom.

A reporter asked Lorre what is his role, as a powerful producer at the network, in making sure the business is a safe environment. It was a reference to the New York article that posted online Friday, in which six women six women describe unwanted kissing and touching by CBS Corp CEO Leslie Moonves — often during business meetings.

Investigative reporter Ronan Farrow interviewed the women who allege that, between the nineteen-eighties and the late aughts, they were sexually harassed by Moonves and suffered professionally after rebuffing his advances.

Lorre responded to the question, telling the reporter they should “talk later,” adding he did not think The Kominsky Method Q&A was the proper venue to discuss.

But, on the broader issue of sexual harassment in the workplace, Lorre observed, “I do think it is important to have a safe work environment. I have been in some unsafe work environments in television; you can read about them,”  he added getting a laugh, having famously exited Roseanne over creative differences with star Roseanne Barr.

“You can’t do good work in an unsafe environment and it has to be made safe for everyone,” Lorre told the TCA gathering.

“Why else would anyone want to work in that environment. You can’t do comedy if you are frightened. You can’t do good work if you don’t feel safe.”

Lorre then boiled it down, insisting it should “go without saying” that everyone deserves “common courtesy and decency.”

CBS’s independent directors issued a statement ahead of Friday’s New Yorker investigation release, in which six women describe unwanted kissing and touching — often during business meetings.

Investigative reporter Ronan Farrow interviewed the women who allege that, between the nineteen-eighties and the late aughts, they were sexually harassed by Moonves and suffered professionally after rebuffing his advances.

“What happened to me was a sexual assault, and then I was fired for not participating,” actress and writer Illeana Douglas said in the New Yorker account, which published online Friday and will appear in the August 6 & 13, 2018 print issue.

All of the women who spoke with Farrow said they feared retaliation by Moonves, who is among the industry’s most powerful and well-compensated executives.

In a statement to New Yorker, Moonves said he recognized “that there were times decades ago when I may have made some women uncomfortable by making advances.”

“Those were mistakes, and I regret them immensely.”