The BBC is taking its cues from the NFL after introducing its own version of the Rooney rule in order to boost diversity across the organization.

The move comes after the British public broadcaster has published a “landmark” report on career progression and culture for staff from a black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) background. It is introducing a policy that ensures shortlists for all jobs above a certain level include at least one person from a BAME background. This echoes the Rooney rule, the NFL policy that requires football teams to interview ethnic-minority candidates for head coaching and senior football operation jobs.

The report has been produced by a team of staff from across the BBC, including BBC Studios CEO Tim Davie and BBC Head of Diversity and Inclusion Tunde Ogungbesan.

The BBC aims to have at least two BAME members on its Executive Committee and Divisional Senior Leadership teams by the end of 2020. It is also developing plans to increase BAME representation across all of its divisions that currently have less than 10% BAME staff.

BBC Director-General Tony Hall said, “This is an excellent report based on an unprecedented level of engagement from staff. They are a range of proposals which we believe will transform the BBC. By better reflecting the broader population we will make better programs that reflect the lives interests and concerns of everyone.

“The proposals build on our existing initiatives, which have been making a difference, but this is now a real chance to accelerate change in an unparalleled way. Today’s report is a huge step forward. There is no question of whether we implement it. We will. This is a great opportunity. We will grasp it.”