Now in weekend 16, Disney/Pixar’s forgetful blue tang has flapped her fins across the $1B global box office line. The domestic cume on Finding Dory through today is $484.8M with international at $516.7M. Alongside Toy Story 3, the film is Pixar’s second billion-dollar release as well as the Walt Disney Studios’ fourth billion-dollar release in the past 12 months and its 12th ever. Dory, directed by Andrew Stanton, is now the 5th biggest animated film of all time worldwide where the full estimated tally through today is $1,001.5M.

Released 13 years after predecessor Finding Nemo ($940M WW), Dory swam up a storm in such markets as Japan, the UK and Australia. Most recently, it released in its final markets: Germany, Austria and German-speaking Switzerland. That was a strategic move on a late date which has been good to Pixar before.

Dory first debuted domestically on June 17 with $135M, the biggest start ever for an animated film. It’s the top movie in North America for 2016 and the 7th biggest ever. In that same June frame, Dory cast a net in 29 offshore territories with a $50.7M launch to take the No. 1 spot at the international box office. In the current frame, Dory and her pals at the aquarium put $8.9M in the tank from 16 overseas markets.

The space between Dory and Nemo clearly didn’t hurt the picture. The fish tale tapped into a nostalgia factor for a lot of folks. It also brought smaller kids into theaters for the sequel whose earlier version they likely have seen on a DVD loop. Similarly, Toy Story 3 ($648M intl) came 11 years after Toy Story 2 ($239M intl), and Monsters University ($475M intl) enrolled 12 years post Monsters Inc ($273M intl). Dory may not catch up on Nemo overseas, however, with that film having made $559.4M offshore vs Dory‘s current $517M — fluctuating exchange rates will have had an impact there. On each of Nemo, Toy Story 3 and Monsters Inc, Japan was the biggest market outside the U.S. by far.

The same goes for the current reef dwellers. Japan has grossed $65.9M, followed by the UK at $55M and China at $38.4M. The latter figure doesn’t compare to the outsize success of some other Disney animation and live-action films, but is the best Middle Kingdom score for a Pixar movie ever as audiences become more familiar with the brand. Rounding out the Top 10 international markets are: Australia ($36.2M), Brazil ($34.5M), Mexico ($24.8M), France ($21.8M), Spain ($20M), Germany ($19.4M) and Korea ($18.2M). Finding Dory stands as the No. 3 grossing movie globally of 2016.