CBS News president David Rhodes sent a note to staff in wake of Washington Post’s latest article on Charlie Rose in which it reported far more women allege they were sexually harassed by the former CBS This Morning co-host/60 Minutes contributor than previously reported.

Rhode’s memo:

From time to time since we terminated Charlie Rose, I’ve done my best to keep everyone as informed as possible about what we are doing to ensure a safe and respectful environment for people to do their best work here at CBS News. Some of these efforts have been confidential, particularly when they involved sensitive personnel issues.

In light of today’s article, I’d like to share that we have continued to investigate a number of issues consistent with our

long-standing policies. As needed our company has supported this effort with the independent advice of one of the nation’s pre-eminent employment lawyers from Proskauer, which has a highly-regarded practice in these matters.

This has been a significant focus for us this year. It should be, since getting this right is critical. So is our responsibility to afford due process to all concerned. The journalism we do here is important—but nothing is more important than the people who do it.

Several important steps have already been taken. We’ve added in-person training around misconduct, and this training is mandatory. We’ve convened a Working Group of colleagues not limited to the HR and Legal areas in order to give each other the tools we need to report issues and handle problems as management. We’ve seen that best practices in the workplace require a focus not just on sexual misconduct but also on pay practices, diversity, and inclusion. We’ve made great strides in these areas in recent years, and we want to be in a leadership role in our industry in every one of these categories.

We will continue our accounting for what has happened here before, and we will be the best place to do what we do in the future—I know we can be.