Sterling K. Brown – the “K” for Kathleen, he finally revealed – brought all his heat to Saturday Night Live last night, giving the show whatever reasons it needed to turn out parodies of Black Panther and This Is Us. And Brown does a pretty terrific Ben Carson, too.

In the Black Panther sketch – set up as a deleted scene from the film – Brown and cast member Leslie Jones play forebears of T’Challa (Chris Redd), welcoming the young man to the “astral realm of the ancestors” where he meets those of his “royal bloodline stretching through all of time…even those who married into it.”

“Alright, who wants a burger?” shouts Kenan Thompson’s Uncle M’Butu, clearly one of the in-laws. In a realm of proud panthers, M’Butu is a warthog.

Explaining his newfound non-living status, M’Butu says, “You know how my old lady is one of them bald warrior women who guard the king? Well, the other night, I made a suggestion she might wear a wig, just to be playful. I said, Damn woman, I’m tired of making love to Michael Jordan. That’s the last thing I remember.”

In a scene pitched perfectly to his sweet spot, Thompson nails it. Watch it above.

SNL went political with its take on Brown’s TV series This Is Us, presenting a digital short called This Is U.S., “the real life drama that’s happening in our government every day.”

“Critics call it ‘Like This Is Us, but without the parts that feel good.”

Brown plays a in-over-his-head Dr. Ben Carson, Aidy Bryant reprises her Sarah Huckabee Sanders (she leaves post-it notes for herself reading “Stop Lying Sarah”) and Pete Davidson plays a panicked Jared Kushner.

And like This Is Us, the promo promises, “There will be hella crying.”

On “Family Feud: Oscars Edition,” Brown plays rapper of earnest messages Common, described by Kenan Thompson’s Steve Harvey as “Dr. Martin Luther Seuss.”

The premise: This year’s Oscar winners compete against its losers on the Feud, a set-up that gives the cast a chance to take on some new faces – and Kate McKinnon’s actually seems to become Frances McDormand. Alex Moffat’s not far behind with Willem Dafoe.

Check out the moment when Chris Redd’s Jordan Peele explains to Thompson’s Steve Harvey why he left sketch comedy for the big time of Get Out. Suddenly it’s Thompson, not Harvey, who’s listening.

And here’s Brown’s monologue, which has some fun with the actor’s sensitive This Is Us portrayal and that show’s weekly trail of tears.