Endemol Shine has found that there is no gender pay gap at the British super indie, while other firms including ITN face a starker challenge as the figures for pay between men and women in the British television business have started to emerge.

Endemol Shine UK has discovered that there was no pay gap between genders in 2017 for mean pay and found that women earn 4% than men on a median basis. This compares to the 9.1% national gender pay gap for 2017 reported by the Office of National Statistics.

These figures cover all UK staff that work at the company, including staff at its British indies such as Broadchurch producer Kudos, Fortitude producer Fifty Fathoms and Big Brother producer Initial. Some 53% of staff are female and 47% male, according to its figures. Richard Johnston, CEO Endemol Shine UK said, that he was incredibly proud that Endemol Shine UK is not reporting a gender pay gap. “We are committed to equality and have always worked hard to ensure that people are rewarded fairly for the work they do. This shines through in these figures and is one of the reasons why 95% of our staff when surveyed said they felt genuinely proud to work for the company,” he added.

However, there’s a trickier picture at ITN, which produces news programs for broadcasters such as ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 as well as series such as Netflix’s Drug Lords. The company found that pays men an average of 19.6% more than women on a mean basis and 18.2% on a median basis. However, the company said despite 17 of its top 20 earners being men, it did not have an equal pay problem in terms of paying men and women in the same roles. It was criticized by some employees, including C4 News presenter Cathy Newman (left) and C4 News health and social care correspondent Victoria Macdonald.

“Our pay gap is mainly caused by there being fewer women than men in many of the most senior roles in the company, and to close it we must achieve equal representation between men and women at every level of seniority,” said ITN CEO John Hardie. “We’ll do this by working together to tackle the root causes of the pay gap, as well as creating a culture in which everyone has a voice and equal chance of success. We’ll be closely monitoring our progress over the coming months and years, and I look forward to reporting back on how we are doing.”

These figures compare with a mean gender pay gap at the BBC of 10.7%. All public and private companies with more than 250 employees must report their gender pay gap by 4 April. Over 2,000 British firms have already done so, while around 7,000, including a number of major entertainment employers including ITV, Viacom and All3Media still to do so.