Each episode of CBS All Access series The Good Fight‘s Season 2 will be named for how many days Donald Trump has been President of the United States.

Like a hostage crisis, Robert King explained to Deadline.

Which, he said, speaks very much to the state of mind of Christine Baranski’s character  Diane, who will continue, in the second batch of episodes, to grapple with the insanity of a world in which Trump is POTUS.

The first episode, for instance, available March 4, is titled “Day 408.”  Episode 2 is “Day 415,” for those keeping score.

In Season 2 of the set-in-real-time series,  the world is going insane, CBS describes, stating the obvious.

More specific to the series, the Chicago murder rate is on the rise and, amidst the insanity, Diane, Lucca, Maia and the rest of the law firm find themselves under psychological assault when a client at another firm kills his lawyer for overcharging. After a copycat murder, the firm begins to look at its own clients suspiciously.

Meanwhile, Diane battles with a new partner at the firm, Liz Reddick-Lawrence (Audra McDonald); Maia becomes tougher after her parents’ scandal puts her on trial; and Lucca is brought back into Colin’s orbit.

On the Trumpian level, the season will grapple with some of the “evergreens of this administration,” Michelle King added: impeachment, Russia, prostitution, sexual harassment, etc.

There will be a nod to Stormy Daniels, though that episode thematically will be more golden shower-ish, as the series characters continue to marvel that they can’t believe we are talking this way about the President of the United States. Another episode is a near Watergate parody, the Kings promised.

The Kings have not yet decided the degree to which they will draw attention to the hostage-crisis episode titles, any one of which might become an iconic number if something big breaks in Trumpocalypse on that day.

The Kings acknowledge they’re much more aware of titles than they used to be when this show’s mothership series, The Good Wife, aired on CBS, titles being far more relevant to the world of streaming.

Though the Kings previously have talked about America’s Trump fatigue as they worked on the series’ second season, they said they decided to hang a lantern on that. They’re working on the theory it’s sometimes healthy for people to laugh at the ludicrous place in which they find themselves, citing Tennessee Williams response when asked by a reporter for his definition of happiness:

“Insensitivity, I guess.”