Wunmi Mosaku, star of Jack Thorne’s C4 drama Kiri, has joined the cast of BBC crime drama Luther as it returns for a fifth series. Mosaku, who has also appeared in Sky Atlantic/Showtime’s Guerrilla and Netflix’s Black Mirror, will play D.S. Catherine Halliday in the BBC Studios-produced series. Mosaku, who is represented by Scott Marshall, Gersh and Principal Entertainment LA, joins Idris Elba, Dermot Crowley, Michael Smiley and Patrick Malahide in the four-part drama, which will air later this year. BBC Drama Controller Piers Wenger said: “It’s fantastic to have Idris Elba and the team back filming in London and we are thrilled that the exceptional Wunmi Mosaku will be returning to BBC One to join this already stellar cast. Neil Cross’ scripts for this fifth series of Luther are explosive and fans won’t be disappointed.”

Hannah Brownhill has joined Renegade Pictures as Director of Development where she will help build the slate of factuals and formats. The exec comes to the UK-based company, which is owned by Warner Bros International Television Production, from FremantleMedia’s Boundless where she was Head of Development. Her credits include Four Rooms (C4), Great British Railway Journeys (BBC2) and Would Like To Meet (BBC2). She has also secured such formats as The Week The Landlords Moved In (BBC1), Secrets In My Family (W), An Hour To Save A Life (BBC2) and World’s Toughest Jobs (BBC3).

Gavin and Rebecca Scott, whose credits include George Lucas’ The Young Indiana Jones, are developing a $14M drama with a female, Darth Vader-style protagonist. UK production company Tuvalu Entertainment has teamed with Germany’s ZDF Enterprises on One Bad Apple, a series that looks at what happens when the Devil’s daughter is enrolled in a respectable English boarding school. It is developing the drama as a 10-part returning series and will pitch to networks later this week. Tuvalu Entertainment’s Paul Johnson described the series as “Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Clueless meets Riverdale and The Omen wrapped around Indiana Jones”. Rebecca Scott said the #TimesUp and #MeToo campaigns mean that the show is particularly timely.  “This is a story about two young women, granted one is evil, discovering who they are and what they are truly capable of. That is a very empowering message and one I am proud of be living out in real time and even prouder to be a part of creating with One Bad Apple.”