When Elan and Jonathan Bogarín’s Grandma Annette died, they were ordered to sell her cluttered New Jersey home and toss out everything inside. That seemingly mundane (and a bit sad) task became an extraordinary journey, and turned into 306 Hollywood, first-ever documentary to play the Sundance Film Festival’s NEXT section. The pic in fact has its world premiere as NEXT’s opening-night film Thursday at the Prospector Square Theater in Park City.

What the Bogarins embark on is no less than an archaeological excavation: Grandma’s home becomes a Roman ruin. With help from physicists, curators, archivists and artists, they unearth the relics of their family, and along the way show that ordinary objects can transform into a metaphor for the nature of memory, time, and history.

Fittingly, the pic will have an accompanying exhibit throughout the festival at the David Beavis Gallery (314 Main St.), a few doors down from the Egyptian. It will feature items from the film including dresses and belongings, along with the model house used throughout the film and other props and stills.

“Our film started over 10 years ago, capturing completely honest and hilarious conversations with our Grandma, and has evolved into a magical realist world where a house becomes a universe,” said the brother and sister, New York visual artists who make their feature directorial debuts here and co-wrote the docu with Nyneve Laura Minear. “It’s something we hope everyone can see some of themselves in: how a family home is a portal to your identity, sense of self, and of course all of your stories and memories.”

Check out the exclusive clip above.