Thirty-five years later the Oscar-nominated production design by Lawrence G. Paull, David L. Snyder and Linda DeScenna in 1982’s Blade Runner is still considered marvelous, so how do you top that in the film’s sequel? Oscar-winning cinematic architect Dennis Gassner was entrusted with that responsibility of jumping the Los Angeles skyline in that movie (set in 2019) 30 years forward to Blade Runner 2049In our latest Crew Call podcast, Gassner describes the “brutality” philosophy of the future that both he and director Denis Villeneuve painted, how famed concept artist Syd Mead who worked on the original film was involved in the sequel, and how most of 2049 was shot with actual sets (despite that gorgeous birdeye’s shot of the cliff-tall Atari sign). Gassner was nominated for five Oscars in production design for 2015’s Into the Woods, 2008’s The Golden Compass, 2003’s Road to Perdition, and twice in one year, 1992’s Barton Fink and Bugsy, the latter of which earned a nomination. Take a listen.

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