Donald Trump’s Inaugural Crowd Size Truther wants you to know – as does Fox News – that Hollywood thinks it’s “kind of cool” to say they “won’t even show up to see the President of the United States” while he, Sean Spicer, is willing to mow President Obama’s lawn if Obama called him today and asked. What the clip above.

Spicer recently re-emerged with a new book deal, making appearances to dismiss any lingering ideas that he was rebranding himself in his various late-night and Emmy Awards appearances after getting squeezed out of the White House.

Thursday’s stops included a stop on Fox News’ Fox Business Network, where he got asked about Tom Hanks “turning his back on the White House” when asked whether he’d like to screen his new movie The Post at Trump’s digs. Short version: “No.”

The film recounts Washington Post‘s early 70’s race with NYT to break news on the Pentagon Papers, a study leaked by former Rand military analyst Daniel Ellsberg, revealing the country’s losing battle in waging the Vietnam War.

Hailed as a strong statement on the First Amendment and the importance of a free press, the Steven Spielberg movie details WaPo’s attempt to land and publish the archive, under threat of lawsuits, shut down and a President Nixon intent on revenge.

Nothing like the Trump White House.

Which explains why Spicer is so disappointed in Hanks’ response to the question.

“At some point it has become now cool to be, like, ‘I’m not going to go do this.’ And at some point, like I would tell you this right now, if President Obama called me today and said ‘Hey, come mow my lawn,’ I’d do it. Because I think that there’s something that we all should come together as Americans and want to support our leaders, our elected officials — Republican, Democrat,” Spicer scolded.

“And I think the idea that it’s become kind of cool to say, ‘I won’t even show up to see the President of the United States’ is a sad commentary on where we are. And I think, for people like Tom Hanks, who is a great film producer and director, he should take the lead and maybe say, ‘You know what, I want to go talk to the President about these important issues that were brought up in my movie The Post.’”

Setting up the Screening Question, Hanks had been asked by The Hollywood Reporter what’s troubling to him about how the press is being treated today in Washington.

“There are people in power trying to — if not quash or stop the right to publication, denigrate it to the point [where] they are saying there is no truth to it whatsoever,” Hanks responded. “And there are stories out there that are the truth, [in] organs of the Fourth Estate like the New York Times and the Washington Post.”

Then came the Screening Question, to which Hanks answered: “I don’t think I would. Because I think that at some point — look, I didn’t think things were going to be this way last November. I would not have been able to imagine that we would be living in a country where neo-Nazis are doing torchlight parades in Charlottesville [Va.] and jokes about Pocahontas are being made in front of the Navajo code talkers.”

Hanks said each person had to decide “when we take to the ramparts,” so, “I would probably vote not to go.”

For the record, Trump said there were “good people” on both sides in the fatal Charlottesville incident. And, and Trump’s the fellow who made the Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas crack to Navajo code talkers who had been posed for the photo op in front of the White House portrait of Andrew Jackson.

Making Hanks’ point, not intentionally, Fox News’s business network fill in-anchor Dagen McDowell had started Spicer’s visit Thursday morning with video of Trump, on Wednesday, asking HUD Secretary Ben Carson to pray for members of the media in the room.  Because “maybe a good solid prayer” would turn them honest, Trump snickered at the White House Cabinet meeting photo-op.