Just days after Bryan Singer was fired from Bohemian Rhapsody, the director is now facing a lawsuit for allegedly sexually assaulting a 17-year old boy in Washington State back in 2003.

“As a result of the misconduct and unlawful acts described herein, Plaintiff has suffered, and continues to suffer, general and special damages,” the Pacific Northwest filing on behalf of Cesar Sanchez-Guzman says. “These damages include, but are not limited to, emotional distress, mental anguish, physical and mental pain and suffering, a decrease in his ability to enjoy life, past and future medical expenses, attorneys’ fees and costs, and other general and special damages, all in an amount to be determined at trial” (read it here).

The incident described in the filing supposedly occurred on a yacht party of 14-years ago where Singer invited the then teen to a secluded back room and allegedly assaulted him. The gathering was hosted by technology investor Leslie Waters “who frequently hosted parties for young gay males in the Seattle area,” the suit notes. It should be noted that the age of consent in Washington state is 16-years old, which is likely why the first claim here is for sexual assault.

“Later, Bryan Singer approached Cesar and told him that he was a producer in Hollywood and that he could help Cesar get into acting as long as Cesar never said anything about the incident,” the three claim document adds. “He then told Cesar that no one would believe him if he ever reported the incident, and that he could hire people who are capable of ruining someone’s reputation.”

Prepared by sexual abuse case specialists HermanLaw and filed by local counsel in the Evergreen State, the suit claims sexual assault and battery, intentional infliction of emotional distress and sexual exploitation of children. The last claim may seem  odd as Sanchez-Guzman was not underage at the time of the alleged assault. However, That Washington state’s age of consent statute has certain limitations too, such as that the adult may be not more than around five years older than the teen.

“Bryan categorically denies these allegations and will vehemently defend this lawsuit to the very end,” said a representative for Singer in response to today’s suit.

This is not the first time the A-list Hollywood director has been accused of sexual misconduct.

Michael Egan III filed a civil suit against the X-Men helmer in 2014, alleging the director had drugged him and forced him sto have sex at parties at a mansion in Encino and in Hawaii several years beforehand. Hollywood heavyweight lawyer Marty Singer, representing the unrelated director, bluntly called the suit “an attempted shakedown of Bryan Singer.” Egan subsequently withdrew his suit. In December of 2014, Egan was indicted over securities fraud and wire fraud related to a fraudulent investment scheme. He spent two years behind bars for that.

In one of Singer’s earlier films, Apt Pupil, a 14-year-old extra named Devin St.Albin had filed a lawsuit claiming that the filmmaker had ordered him and other minors to strip for a scene that was shot in the showers.

This is also not the first time HermanLaw and Bryan Singer have encountered each other. Jeff Herman was Egan’s lawyer against Singer and others in 2014. The lawyer, who is currently taking on The Weinstein Company in a $5 million suit over Harvey Weinstein’s ” sexual misconduct,” ended up dropping Egan as a client as the case became thinner and thinner. The Miami based attorney eventually apologized to Singer and others named in the matter.

“Based on what I know now, I believe that I participated in making what I now know to be untrue and proveably false allegations against you,” Herman wrote in a 2015 letter to  producer Garth Ancier, ex-Disney exec David Neuman and Singer. “Had I known what I learned after filing the lawsuits, I would never have filed these claims against you. I deeply regret the pain, suffering and damages the lawsuits and publicity have caused you, and your family, friends, and colleagues.” A payment over a million dollars was also sent by Herman.

“Notwithstanding his track record, this same lawyer is coming after Bryan again,” said Singer’s reps on Thursday.  “We are confident that this case will turn out the same way the Egan case did.  And once Bryan prevails, he will pursue his own claims for malicious prosecution.”