Following its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, and a sold out performance at the recent London Film Festival, the Michael Caine-produced and -narrated 1960s Britain documentary My Generation has been acquired by Lionsgate UK. An early 2018 theatrical release is planned. The company previously handled Caine-starrer Harry Brown.

My Generation, which received an eight-minute standing ovation in Venice, is directed by David Batty and also produced by Simon Fuller. It’s a look at the Swinging Sixties in Britain, and particularly London, for which Caine interviewed contemporaries who were rising at the time. They include the likes of Paul McCartney, Marianne Faithfull, Twiggy, Mary Quant and The Who’s Roger Daltrey.

Told through film clips, archival footage and music — and with Caine as raconteur — the movie looks at the cultural revolution of the era. It was an important time in Caine’s life, he told me in Venice, not just because he was a young actor “and very poor and trying to make my way in the world, but the way the 60s changed England. When I was 20 and came out of the Army, there was only one radio station, and they never played pop music. It was very snobbish.”

The ’60s was a heady time, Caine recalled when we spoke in September. “We all knew each other, and I never met anybody who didn’t become famous.” His various flatmates included Terrence Stamp and Vidal Sassoon. “Once it started, there was such a flood you couldn’t stop it.”

My Generation is written by Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais (The Bank Job). Fuller produces alongside Caine, Clement, La Frenais and Fodhla Cronin O’Reilly (Lady Macbeth). Pride’s James Clayton is exec producer.

IM Global is handling world rights.