Hillary Clinton just issued a short statement about revelations on major campaign donor Harvey Weinstein:

I was shocked and appalled by the revelation about Harvey Weinstein. The behavior described by women coming forward cannot be tolerated. Their courage and the support of others is critical in helping to stop this kind of behavior.

This band-aid made no mention as to whether Clinton intends to return any of the campaign dollars doled out to her by the Hollywood mogul, whose career began to unravel on October 5 when the New York Times wrote a major article detailing decades of sexual assault claims and settlements. In last year’s presidential election, Weinstein maxed out on Clinton, giving her as much money as the feds allow, but he also threw fundraisers for her at which he bundled millions more.

Clinton’s silence lasted longer than it took The Weinstein Company board to fire Weinstein from his own company, on October 8.

Clinton’s statement, finally breaking her deafening silence, came not long after New Yorker published its highly anticipated article on Weinstein, based on Ronan Farrow’s 10-month investigation; it’s even more devastating than the New York Times revelations last Thursday, writes Deadline’s Mike Fleming. Also on Tuesday, NYT updated its reporting, adding Gwyneth Paltrow and Angelina Jolie‘s names to those who have come forward to talk publicly about their encounters with the former Miramax and TWC head.

New Yorker’s piece begins with an allegation by the Italian actress-director Asia Argento that 20 years ago, Weinstein forcibly

performed oral sex on her. She is one of three women who claimed to Farrow in the article that Weinstein raped them.

Harvey Weinstein
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Farrow writes he was told by 13 women that Weinstein sexually harassed or assaulted them, with three claiming rape and four saying they experienced unwanted touching that could be classified as an assault. Weinstein has denied the new charges in the New Yorker piece.

Weinstein has denied the allegations in a statement:

“Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances. Mr. Weinstein obviously can’t speak to anonymous allegations, but with respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual. Mr. Weinstein has begun counseling, has listened to the community and is pursuing a better path. Mr. Weinstein is hoping that, if he makes enough progress, he will be given a second chance.”

Clinton’s clipped statement also came just a few hours after her former running mate ran to her defense on CNN, as the network pointedly questioned why Clinton spoke Monday at University of California, Davis, without any mention of Weinstein. Sen. Tim Kaine insisted “any leader” should publicly denounce the Hollywood producer’s “low-life” behavior, and, while insisting “I’m nobody’s press secretary; I’m a U.S. senator,” added,  “I’m sure she’ll have a word to say when the time is right for her.”