Update, Aug. 5: She’s not done yet. After becoming the highest-grossing film of the summer and the second-highest of the year, Warner Bros./DC’s Wonder Woman will cross the $400M mark at the domestic box office on Monday, becoming one of 19 titles to clock in that range on the all-time U.S/Canada chart. Worldwide she stands north of $794M, nearing $800M.

By Sunday, Wonder Woman is expected to reach $399.4M with $2.2M in her 10th weekend at 1,307 venues. Next B.O. target for Wonder Woman? Overtaking Sony’s Spider-Man 3 ($403.7M) and maybe even last summer’s Disney/Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War ($408M).

Warner Bros. confirmed the sequel for Wonder Woman at Comic-Con and a few days later announced its release date as Dec. 13, 2019. Leading gal Gal Gadot will put the boots back on, but no director is confirmed yet.

Warner Bros.

In a depressed summer box office, Wonder Woman has been the top draw, and despite opening lower than Disney/Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol.  2., $103.2M to $146.5M, she has posted a near 3.9 multiple, which is higher than most superhero films, including Doctor Strange (2.7x) Captain America: Civil War (2.2x), Suicide Squad (2.4x), and Batman v. Superman (2x). The Patty Jenkins-directed movie has broken many glass ceilings, including the best opening ever for a title by a female director and the best global haul for a live-action film directed by a woman.  Wonder Woman continues to show that there’s a big demand and big business for female-led tentpoles after Star Wars Force Awakes, Rogue One, and The Hunger Games trilogy.

We detail Wonder Woman‘s trajectory in the previous post.

Previous, July 18: As we first pointed out Friday night, Warner Bros./DC’s Wonder Woman will fly over Disney/Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 at the domestic box office this coming weekend with more than $387M. This easily will make Wonder Woman the highest-grossing title of the domestic summer B.O. and the second best so far this year after Disney’s Beauty and the Beast ($504M).

DC beating a Marvel title at the summer box office?

That’s a feat no one saw coming at the start of the season, especially after Wonder Woman opened to 30% less than GOTG2‘s bow, $103.2M to $146.5M. Last summer, Disney/Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War was summer’s top-grossing live-action title with $408M, outstripping both WB/DC’s August release Suicide Squad ($325M) and Easter/spring title Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice ($330.4M).

Wonder Woman counts $381.5M through Monday, about $5.15M behind GOTG2‘s $386.7M. Among the first chapters for a solo superhero series, Wonder Woman is the second best on the all-time U.S./Canada B.O. chart after Sony/Marvel’s 2002 Spider-Man ($403.7M). She’s also the third-highest-grossing Warner Bros. release of all time stateside after The Dark Knight ($534.9M) and The Dark Knight Rises ($448.1M) –both DC titles — and the pic recently clicked past Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 ($381M). 

Warner Bros.

Wonder Woman counts several benchmarks in what has been a sleepy summer with flagging ticket sales overall and plummeting exhibition stocks. The Patty Jenkins-directed movie notched the best opening ever for a title by a female director and the best global haul for a live-action film directed by a woman. In the wake of such low-budget duds as Fist Fight, CHIPS, The House and Unforgettable, as well as big-budget bombs like King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, Wonder Woman stands as an oasis at the 2017 box office for WB, easily the studio’s biggest title, followed by The Lego Batman Movie ($175.8M) and Kong: Skull Island ($168M). Despite the combined $1.6 billion worldwide B.O. success of WB’s DC titles Suicide Squad and Batman v. Superman last year, both were met with a lukewarm response from audiences and an even worse slapping by critics. Wonder Woman suffered neither, with an “A” CinemaScore and a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 92% Fresh. The “A” CinemaScore comes with a 3.6 box office multiple off a pic’s opening, and that’s exactly where Wonder Woman stands right now.

For star Gal Gadot, Wonder Woman easily is her highest-grossing film at the domestic B.O. It’s her second to cross the $300M threshold after BvS, with the DC superhero easily blowing smoke in the face of the actress’ Fast and Furious titles: Fast and Furious ($155M), Fast Five ($209.8M) and Fast & Furious 6 ($238.7M).

Wonder Woman‘s stateside climb has been one of soft weekend-to-weekend declines, which have averaged 37% each weekend during its run. By comparison, GOTG2 logged an average of -42% each weekend in its first six weekends following its opening. Most superhero movies can drop anywhere between 55% to the low 60%-tile in their second go-round, and Wonder Woman only dipped 43%.

A lot of this box office momentum can be attributed to the strong turnout by female audiences who have been waiting for this classic superhero’s big screen debut. With any four-quad superhero movie, there’s never any concern about guys showing up; it’s typically the females who trail just a tad behind. But in comScore/Screen Engine’s PostTrak audience polls, women outweighed men 55% to 45% when it came to buying tickets to Wonder Woman, with females ages 25 and up (32%) leading the way, followed by men 25+ (29%) and women under 25 (23%). Forty percent bought tickets because they had been waiting for a Wonder Woman movie, while 28% bought tickets because they’re Gadot fans.

Speaking of the Israeli actress, she will be at San Diego Comic-Con on Saturday along with the Justice League team, breaking more DC news.

If Marvel’s Star Lord gang has any bragging rights over Diana Prince this summer, it’s at the foreign and global tills, where Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 boasts $472.7M abroad and a $859.4M worldwide cume to Wonder Woman‘s $385.3M foreign take and $766.8M global B.O. Unlike last summer, when Captain America: Civil War and Finding Dory easily eclipsed the $1 billion mark worldwide, no summer release has clicked past that mark to date. This leaves Beauty and the Beast and Fate of the Furious as the only 2017 titles to gross more than $1 billion.