Television producer and author Daniel Jay Levy died on August 18 at the age of 58 after a four-year battle with an incurable brain disease called SMART Syndrome, a side-effect of the cerebral radiation he received in 1991 which, at the time, helped to cure his brain cancer.

Levy worked as an agent trainee at the William Morris Agency after graduating from UCLA. He went on to work for Imagine Entertainment and Warner Bros. He optioned the story rights of famed football player Ricky Bell which was adapted into a TV movie for CBS in 1991 titled Triumph of the Heart: The Bell Story starring Mario Van Peebles, which he produced.

After being diagnosed with brain cancer at 33, he became an advocate for his own healthcare by researching how to beat the disease. Physicians recognized his research and they continually referred their patients to him for consultations about how to beat cancer. He wrote about this accomplishment in the 2010 book, From Incurable to Incredible: Cancer Survivors Who Beat the Odds.

As a automobile aficionado, he wrote and published a book about buying, selling, and leasing cars in 1994 called  Automobile Aerobics: Exercise Your Right to Trim Thousands off the Price of Your Next Automobile and Make the Dealership Sweat.

He is survived by his wife of 23 years Sandra Manning Levy and his daughters Madeline Charlotte Levy and Chelsea Elizabeth
Levy.