“Do you know if the President records conversations in the Oval Office, or anywhere in the White House?” Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions as he testified under oath today before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

“I do not,” Sessions said.

“Let me ask you this: If in fact any President were to record conversations in their official duties in the White House… would there be an obligation to preserve those records?” Rubio drilled down.

“I don’t know, Senator Rubio,” the Attorney General acknowledged, adding, “Probably so.”

Five days earlier, when he testified before same committee, former FBI Director James Comey said he had set in motion the leak of his memo about his dinner with President Donald Trump to the New York Times, after Trump tweeted threateningly after sacking Comey that he’d better hope there were no tapes of their conversations before he began talking to the media.

Comey said he gave a copy of the memo to a pal when Trump suggested he taped their conversation. Comey told the committee he wanted to get out into the public his version of what went down. “My judgment was I needed to get that out into the public square,” he said, under oath.

Last Friday, Trump continued to dodge direct questions as to whether he taped conversations with Comey, as he had suggested in that tweet. “Well, I will tell you about that, sometime in the very near future,” Trump answered the question, reality-TV-ishly. And a couple days later, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer told reporters at a briefing that Trump would make the reveal when he was good and ready.