“Our intention is to show the world as realistically as possible,” Humans writer Jonathan Brackley told TV critics at TCA, where he’d come to plug the second season of the AMC’s sci-fi series, debuting Monday, February 13.

“We did not want to show utopia or dystopia. We always wanted the audience to decide, and think about the issues. Our ideal situation would be a couple sitting around at home saying, ‘Should we get one of these things?’ Something that provok es discussion.”

Asked if they enjoyed the “major wave of publicity” when HBO’s Westworld launched and people began comparing and contrasting, Brackley answered, “From our point of view it’s only a good thing. If people are interested in the issues we’re all talking about, that’s great. People talking about Westworld probably are going to watch our show and vice versa,” he said, adding “our shows are very different.”

Set in a parallel present and exploring what happens when the lines between humans and machines are blurred, the second season picks up several months after the events of Season one. Carrie-Anne Moss joins the cast as Dr. Athena Morrow, a pre-eminent Artificial Intelligence expert who is driven by her own motives to create a new kind of machine consciousness. As unconfirmed reports of synths behaving inexplicably begin to surface, the ripple effects of one simple yet seismic decision sees the past make a dramatic return.