“Is there anything a billionaire can’t solve?” and are they having second thoughts about the premise (enigmatic tech billionaire purchases troubled police precinct to fix it), a jaded TV critic asked creators of Fox’s upcoming cop drama APB, days before Donald Trump is sworn in as president.

LOGLINE: Inspired by true events, APB is about the Chicago Police Department spiraling out of control amid sky-high crime, officer-involved shootings, cover-ups and corruption. After witnessing a violent crime first-hand, genius tech billionaire Gideon Reeves (Justin Kirk), decides to do something about it, putting up millions of dollars of his own money to take over the troubled 13th Precinct and reboot it as a private police force: better, faster and smarter than anything seen before. With cutting-edge technology and revolutionary new ideas, Gideon plans to rethink everything about the way cops fight crime.

EP Matt Nix noted that the series is inspired by a true story about a police precinct in New Orleans, where a rich guy paid for a small police force to help patrol. (The series is inspired by the July New York Times Magazine article headlined “Who Runs the Streets of New Orleans.”)

That did not seem to help during the Q&A on the same day Trump savaged press outlets that reported POETUS allegedly had received classified briefings suggesting the Kremlin has potentially “compromising” information about our next president. The panel also came just days after Trump dismissed the press as “fake” after Meryl Streep’s Golden Globes speech urging journalists to hold power to account.

EP Trey Callaway promised the Gideon Reed character played by Justin Kirk will run into some of the ramifications of taking his eye off his company for this “new experiment” in crime fighting. And Nix said there will be discussion in the show that privatizing a police force is “not necessarily a great thing” and that “this could get nightmarish if we’re not careful.”

But, Nix insisted, “I think you make much more progress in the world by talking to the best sides of all people — and I mean that on the right and the left — and say, ‘Yes, you know what? Money does things that no money doesn’t do.”

He added: “There are lessons to be drawn from the business community and from disruption and that power must be wielded responsibility. I think most Trump supporters would agree with that, and I think that’s important to articulate on television.”