The Nonfiction Producers Association, which represents companies that produce about half of all reality TV shows airing in the U.S., now wants to represent the other half as well. To that end, it’s opening its membership to include smaller companies and sole proprietors – executive producers and showrunners who have established their own production labels.

The 41-member organization has also admitted its first Canadian production company, and is offering “associate” status to vendors and other service providers. A new sliding scale dues structure will be based on company size and volume of work, although NPA officials wouldn’t provide specifics.

“As the first platform to serve as a unified voice for nonfiction producers, our members have always been vocal about the value and benefits of the NPA, but this year there’s been an explosion of membership interest from across the industry,” said NPA general manager John Ford. “So we listened and created options that make it easier for more segments of the business to join, including emerging talent with new skills sets and fresh points of view that offer tremendous advantage to the NPA as we continue to address and tackle the key issues driving nonfiction entertainment.”

The NPA also has expanded its executive committee from six representatives to eight, with producers David Garfinkle (Renegade 83) and Jenny Daly (T Group) joining founding members Bruce David Klein (Atlas Media), Laura Johnson (Magilla Entertainment), Brent Montgomery (ITV America), Jon Murray (Bunim Murray), Eric Schotz (LMNO), and Steven Weinstock (True Entertainment and Original Media).

Founded in July 2014, the nonprofit trade group offers information and assistance to production companies and promotes “best practices that ensure production employees, independent contractors, vendors and other stakeholders have a voice and platform for meaningful discourse that can encourage and contribute to the continued success and welfare of all parties within the nonfiction television industry.”

Reality TV remains the least unionized sector of the entertainment industry, but unlike management’s AMPTP, which represents the major studios and networks in contract negotiations with Hollywood’s unions and guilds, the NPA does not represent its members at the bargaining table.