“I would like to promise and pledge to all of my voters and supporters and to all of the people of the United States that I will totally accept the results of this great and historic presidential election – if I win!” GOP candidate Donald Trump this morning told enthusiastic supporters at an Ohio rally.

He was referencing the jaw-dropping moment of the previous night’s  final presidential debate when moderator Chris Wallace asked Trump if he will accept the results of the election on November 8.

Trump had responded: “I will tell you at the time.” The reality TV star-turned-GOP candidate also suggested he thought there should be a cliffhanger, informing Wallace, “I will keep you in suspense.” Trump’s latest campaign storyline has him blasting the election as “rigged” – in much the same way he said the Emmy Awards were rigged when his Apprentice franchise repeatedly failed to nab the win for best reality series.

Wallace seemed taken aback, Hillary Clinton said she was horrified and TV news pundits have been feasting on it ever since. But Stephen Colbert may have said it loudest on his live Late Show that followed the debate : “Oh! Suspense! Democracy is going to end with a cliffhanger! I guess we’re all going to have to wait until November 9 to see if we still have a democracy – to see if Donald Trump is in the mood for a peaceful transfer of power, or if he’s going to wipe his fat a** with the Constitution.”

“Seriously, the debate last night was amazing, and everybody says I won,” Trump boasted today in Ohio. “Including every single online poll, and some had it at 90 and close to 90%.”

Trump told rally goers in Delaware, Ohio, he’s doing this for “the future of our country.”

“Don’t be naive folks,” Trump warned, claiming the Clinton campaign “has paid people to disrupt our rallies and incite absolute total bedlam” triggering shouts of “Lock Her Up! Lock Her Up!”

‘It’s so bad. It’s so bad,” Trump said, calling Clinton “the most corrupt and dishonest person ever to seek the office of President.”

“It’s in that context I was asked the question whether I would agree in advance to concede the results on Election Night if, for some reason we should lose, which we’re not going to lose.”

“I’m being asked to waive centuries of legal precedent, designed to protect the voters.”