Last week’s leadership shakeup at Time Inc was just the beginning of the reshuffling process. Today, newly named Chief Content Officer Alan Murray unveiled his own restructuring for the editorial ranks at some of the nation’s best known publications.

He divided the titles into four groups with Editorial Directors who’ll report to him. The goal is to find “new ways to work together to grow our audience and our business across brands, new ways to take advantage of digital and video opportunities that may cut across brands and new efficiencies in how we operate across brands,” he told staffers in a memo.

Time Editor Nancy Gibbs will oversee the News Group with her magazine, Fortune, and Money.

People Editor Jess Cagle has the Celebrity, Entertainment and Style Group which also includes Entertainment Weekly, InStyle, and Essence.

Chris Stone will remain in charge of the Sports Group, with Sports Illustrated, Golf and SI Kids.

And Travel + Leisure Editor Nathan Lump will run Lifestyle Group, which also includes Real Simple, Southern Living, Sunset, and Cooking Light. Departures Editor in Chief Richard David Story will report to Murray.

Time‘s Deputy Managing Editor Michael Duffy will also serve as the company’s Editorial Director, reporting to Murray. He’ll look to “put together great editorial acts that cut across our brands and help us attract both audience and advertisers” while attending to “matters of editorial standards and integrity.”

The company also will have two digital directors:  People and Entertainment Weekly Digital Editorial Director Will Lee oversees the Celebrity, Entertainment and Style and Sports groups, reporting to Cagle.

And Time Digital Editor Edward Felsenthal will take on the News and Lifestyle groups, reporting to Gibbs.

Meanwhile, StyleWatch Editor will become interim editor of InStyle following the departure this week of InStyle and StyleWatch Editorial Director Ariel Foxman.

The changes come a little more than two years after Time Warner spun off the magazine operation that Henry Luce launched in 1922. Since becoming independent, Time Inc’s stock has lost nearly 23% of its value — and is off about 28% over the last 12 months.

Time Warner had failed to invest in print for about a decade before the spinoff, CEO Joe Ripp told analysts in May. “So we’re looking at the opportunities to bring new services and content into the company, to bring new capabilities into the company.”

And much like in the early days of cable TV, he says, there’s “a new land grab going on and it’s in digital video, over-the-top video and Time Inc. is going to be a major player in that space.”