The first film ever to shoot in Equatorial Guinea will stream for audiences in the English-speaking world, as Netflix has announced acquisition of the drama Where The Road Runs Out. The streaming service is planning an early 2017 release for subscribers in the U.S., Canada, The UK, Australia, New Zealand, and English speaking African countries.

Also shot in The Netherlands and South Africa, the film follows a Rotterdam-based respected scientist and lecturer (Isaach De Bankole), who has grown weary of academia and, sparred by the sudden death of an old friend, moves to reconnect with his African roots by traveling to his friend’s African research station. There, he forges a bond with a local boy while embarking on a potential romance with the woman who runs a local orphanage (Juliet Landau), but when an old friend (Stelio Savante) pays a visit, he finds himself at a crossroads. Directed by Rudolf Buitendach from a script by David Hughes, Where The Road Runs Out also stars Sizo Matsoko. The Netflix deal was brokered by US Distribution/Production Company Fairway Film Alliance and Ocean Avenue Entertainment.

Don't Worry Baby

FilmBuff has licensed U.S. rights to writer-director Julian Branciforte’s dramedy Don’t Worry Baby, with plans for theatrical release and all major VOD platforms beginning July 22. Starring John Magaro (The Big Short), Christopher McDonald (Happy Gilmore), Tom Lipinski (USA Network’s Suits) and Dreama Walker (CBS’ The Good Wife), the film sees a struggling photographer (Magaro) and his philandering father Harry (McDonald) discover that they each had a one-night stand with the same woman, Sara-Beth (Walker), in the same week, and that either one of them might be the biological father of her four-year-old daughter. They pair then agree to share fatherly duties while waiting for paternity test results.

A joint production between The Sight Group and Manamarin, Don’t Worry Baby was produced by Nick Shore and Thomas Kaier along with Jean-Raphael Ambron, Sam Harper, Brendan McHugh and Jamie Krasnoff. The deal was negotiated by Sam Scupp on behalf of FilmBuff.