Emerging from the ashes of bankruptcy and mismanagement, the revived New York City Opera will present a season beginning in September at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater and other venues, General Director Michael Capasso announced today. Among the offerings are two with strong roots on Broadway: The New York premiere, in a new production, of Péter Eötvös’ opera adaptation of Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer Prize-winning epic Angels in America; and Harold Prince’s new production of Leonard Bernstein’s Candide, which had its premiere under Prince’s direction at NYCO in 1982.

The announcement helps resolves at least one mystery about Prince, the noted directed who had planned to bring his retrospective revue, Prince of Broadway, to New York this season after a run last fall in Japan. Prince also withdrew from a planned premiere at the Atlantic Theatre Company of a musical adaptation of the film The Band’s Visit, which is going forward under a different director.

Angels in America will close the City Opera season in June 2017. The adaptation distills the two-night, seven-hour drama into a single evening. The company leads off New York’s cultural season with Opening Night on September 8 with a double bill pairing Rachmaninoff’s rarely heard Aleko (New York staged premiere) and Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci.

The season continues in November with the New York premiere of Tobin Stokes’ Fallujah, about the contemporary consequences of war. January 2017 will be marked by a new production of Candide. Ottorino Respighi’s La campana sommersa (The Sunken Bell), not heard in New York for more than 80 years, will return in spring 2017.

The company’s Ópera en Español series – which will be inaugurated next month with Florencia en el Amazonas (June 22, 23, 25 and 26, 2016) at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater – continues in May 2017 at Harlem Stage with the rarely performed Los Elementos by the Spanish baroque master Antoni de Literes. The New York premiere of Angels in America closes the season in June 2017.

“I’m delighted to unveil a full season for the reorganized company which continues New York City Opera’s historic legacy: classics alongside contemporary works, neglected works by great composers, and explorations of opera’s earliest masterpieces,” Capasso said in the announcement. “I believe our season will have both broad public appeal and the artistic integrity that audiences have
long associated with City Opera.

 See nycopera.com for more details.