In Sing Street, director John Carney’s semi-autobiographical look at 1980s Ireland, a teenage boy forms a band in order to impress a girl and so begins a deep dive into some of the era’s seminal music as the group transitions from covers to original material. U2 obviously looms large over the Irish pop music of that period, and so it sing-street-posterwas that U2 frontman Bono and his bandmate The Edge were at one point attached to help out with the movie’s original music. They ended up not contributing to the film, but Bono has seen the Sundance hit which landed at U.S. theaters April 15, and has given it a ringing endorsement in a statement posted to the band’s official website.

“I remember the 1980s with somewhat of a blush,” Bono writes. “No man’s hair should be bigger than his girlfriend’s. But that was the time. Dublin in Technicolor. In reality it was monochrome and in the grip of a recession, But on video tape, you could be transported. You could wear what you liked, and the more outrageous the better. Anything to wind up the jackbooted skinheads on Dublin’s north side. Make-up on a boy drove rockers wild, and the teachers wilder. Thank God for Bowie, who made all the black eyes okay. And allowed people to find out who they were. My brother gave me the gift of music through my first guitar. We formed a band. In truth, at the same stage, U2 were not as good as the kids in Sing Street. In truth most films you’ll see this year won’t touch Sing Street…”

Of course, Bono has a point — the music performed by the band in Sing Street was written by seasoned songwriters, unlike the raw kids U2 were in the late 70s. Fortunately, no one seems to mind, as the film has received enormous critical acclaim. Currently in theaters, Sing Street stars Ferdia Walsh-Peelo Walsh-Peelo and Lucy Boynton, along with Maria Doyle Kennedy, Aiden Gillen, Jack Reynor, and Kelly Thornton. Anthony Bregman, John Carney, and Martina Niland produced.