On the heels of TNT picking two drama pilots, Good Behavior and Animal Kingdom, to series, the network is clearing the decks for the next pilot cycle that will feature the young William Shakespeare pilot Will, which just cast its lead.

As part of that, TNT has opted not to proceed with its pilot Home, from writer Aron Eli Coleite, Jerry Bruckheimer TV and Warner Horizon. The thriller, about a seemingly idyllic suburban family, was originally developed by TNT and TBS President Kevin Reilly while he was at Fox. He then ordered it to pilot at TNT. The pilot now is being shopped elsewhere by Warner Horizon.

“We’re probably not pursuing it,” Reilly said. “It was actually a high-class problem we had. (Home) was actually a really good pilot; they did a really good job with it. It was just that we had filled our plate with things that I thought were pretty special. But I think someone will end up picking it up; it’s pretty well done.”

TNT also likely is not going forward with its Robbers pilot. The project, from Christopher Cook, Michael Dinner, Sony Pictures TV and Timberman/Beverly, originally was set up with Tim McGraw attached to star, but he later departed. There was an effort to cast the lead, but there were difficulties in the process, leading to the network’s decision to shelf the drama, which was supposed to be made in the same batch as Will. “It is unlikely to go,” Reilly said about Robbers.

Described as being in the literary-noir tradition of Cormac McCarthy’s No Country For Old Men, Robbers tells the story of a cop, two “running buddies” on a crime spree across Texas and the girl who becomes the complication in a very unique love triangle. Everyone has a story. Everyone is a mystery.

TNT is now only working with development projects ordered by the new regime. The last two pilots left over from the previous leadership, the DC Comics and Titans, have received a pass.

In the next couple of months, TNT and TBS are expected to order more pilots, with TBS likely going first. But both networks are expected to avoid casting them during the broadcast pilot season, Reilly noted.