StarzOutlander, the second season of which premieres in April, has been a big hit for for the network, with lots of acclaim and awards nominations. The Ronald D. Moore-exec produced adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s series of novels follows a woman who time travels back and forth between 20th century Britain and 18th Century Scotland (and who has a lot of sex).

Magic, sex, copious violence, ratings and acclaim? That sounds a bit like another swordplay show you might have heard about on HBO. So it was that during Starz’ Outlander panel this morning at TCA, Gabaldon, who was on hand along with Moore and series stars Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, was asked about Game of Thrones.

Specifically, she was asked about A Song of Ice And Fire author George R.R. Martin’s recent (with much regret and apology) confirmation that he won’t make publication deadline for his next book. Which means that the upcoming sixth novel in the series, “The Winds Of Winter,” will come out after the sixth season of Game of Thrones.

5 months
Calling DG's books crap is ignorant. She hasn't been at the top of number one best seller...
6 months
I've read both series and they are both excellent reads.
Bjorn
6 months
Seriously? "They are the most well-written... books I have ever read" Seriously? What else have you read?

Like Martin’s books, the Outlander novels are an ongoing concern. So, is there is the chance, should the television adaption last long enough on Starz that, as with Game of Thrones, the adaptation could outpace the source material? In a word: no. At least according to Gabaldon, who threw an unmistakable velvet glove at George R.R. Martin’s feet this morning during the show’s TCA panel.

“No,” she said when asked about potential deadline problems on her upcoming books. “Unlike George, I write no matter where I am or what I’m doing.” Ouch. Cue heavy “ooooohs” from the audience, and a lot of laughs.

Gabaldon was quick to play somewhat nice. “Everyone has their process,” she said dryly. “He likes to travel and he can’t write when he travels.” But, she added, “I write when I travel so, no.” She then, nicely, stuck the digs in even deeper. Seemingly referring to Martin’s statement that his publisher needs several months to get the books out from the time he turns in a manuscript, she described her own experiences, ending with “I know they can actually get it from the manuscript to bookstores in about 5 weeks – because they do.”