Long-running ’80s/90s family sitcom Full House is, as the whole world knows, continuing in the form of a sequel series on Netflix, Fuller House, which reunites most of the original cast around a gender-flipped premise. Instead of the uncles, the new show focuses on the now-grown Tanner sisters, played by Candace Cameron Bure and Jodie Sweetin. Along with their friend Kimmy Gibbler (Andrea Barber), the female Tanners band together to raise their kids.

At TCA this afternoon, the three actresses as well as executive producers Jeff Franklin and Robert Boyett were on hand to talk about the series in advance of its February 26 premiere. Among the topics: growing up on Full House, child actors, fans, and how easy this television reunion proved to be.

But given Bure’s outspoken stances on The View, more controversial topics were bound to come up. Asked if Fuller House might feature storylines about equal marriage rights – the original series, with its three father figures, came from a less accepting time – Franklin suggested it’s a possibility. He related how he’d been told by a friend who grew up with gay parents that the original series was for a touchstone, as it proved an easy metaphor to explain his own homelife. Franklin added that he is glad there remains such a fanbase for the show.

Bure was asked outright about her willingness to appear in such a storyline, given her defense on The View of the baker who refused to sell a wedding cake to a same sex couple. She insisted she wasn’t arguing against same sex marriage. “I’m always defending religious freedom and that’s what I was talking about on The View. I didn’t describe my personal feelings about that,” she said.

“But,” she continued, “I’m an actress on a television show and I support all things that we go through as human beings and would love all our characters to explore whatever issues that are current in our culture and our society today and I’m 100% on board with that.”