Scouts Guide To The Zombie Apocalypse will hit home video just 39 days after it first appeared in theaters and Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension will be on VOD after 53 days, Paramount Pictures says this morning. That means the films that were part of a controversial revenue sharing experiment with some exhibition chains will appear in living rooms well before the end of the 90-day window theaters usually require to offer new films exclusively.

On December 8, consumers will be able to buy or rent via digital platforms Scouts Guide, which premiered in theaters October 30. Paranormal Activity first appeared in theaters October 23 and will be available digitally December 15.

ParamountLogo_newThe studio’s deal with chains including AMC Theatres, Cineplex Entertainment, National Amusements, Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, Southern Theatres and Landmark Cinemas allowed it to send the titles to home video 17 days after they were being shown in fewer than 300 domestic theaters.

7 months
This is actually what paramount does to black list scripts (scouts).
Time
7 months
Godfather reboot; Good idea. Hey fellas! Start shooting!
anonymous
7 months
Ashley Brucks. But... it's a team effort. Time for a house cleaning. Your job is to entertain....

In return, the participating chains will collect a percentage of Paramount’s digital revenues — relative to their share of each film’s theatrical gross — up to the end of the usual 90-day window. Scouts Guide has grossed $3.7 million so far domestically, plus $10.3 million abroad. Paranormal Activity has done much better with $18.3 million in domestic sales and $59.2 million internationally.

“This flexible distribution model allows us to maximize the revenue potential of these films, satisfy consumer demand through legitimate digital access, while respecting and preserving an exclusive theatrical window,” says Paramount’s President of Worldwide Distribution and Marketing Megan Colligan.

Others including Regal, Carmike and Cinemark didn’t show the two films.

“We didn’t think the structure or the economics of the test made sense,” Regal CEO Amy Miles told analysts in October. She added, though, that “we would be open to any idea, discussion or other experiment that we felt had the potential to grow the overall pie…. We just didn’t see that in this test, so therefore we didn’t participate.”