UPDATED, 12 PM with overseas numbers: Universal Pictures re-released the Back To The Future trilogy in theaters on Back To The Future Day on Wednesday and grossed $4.8M worldwide. The trio of films played on 1,815 domestic screens making $1.65M and posted $3.2M abroad. The trilogy will continue to play throughout the weekend. October 21, 2015, marked the day that Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) travel to in 1989’s Back To The Future Part II.

Back to the Future dashboardHere’s how foreign broke down: The films ranked in the top three spots in Germany with $1.4M box office and a 38% market share. Austria also took the top three spots with $140K and 50% market share. Italy opened it at No. 1 for the day with $585K and 37% market share. The UK and Ireland placed No. 4 with a solid $345K. France placed No. 8 with $300K. Australia had an exclusive release with Hoyts and placed No. 5 with $54K. The rest of the territories reported a combined total of $450K.

Wednesday’s celebration resonated with fans across generations; even kids in elementary schools across the U.S. were wearing Back To The Future shirts and caps. Lloyd recorded a viral video in the DeLorean car announcing the big day, which drew 1.7M views on the Uni Home Entertainment YouTube channel, and he and Fox stopped by Jimmy Kimmel Live!

On Facebook alone, 27M folks made 45M posts relating to “Back To The Future Day.” By volume, the top countries talking about the series included the U.S., Mexico, Brazil, the UK and Canada.

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The original trilogy — directed/co-written by Bob Zemeckis, co-written/produced by Bob Gale and produced by Steven Spielberg — has generated $416M+ over three films: 1985’s Back To The Future, 1989’s Back To The Future Part II and 1990’s Back To The Future Part III. The last two films were shot back-to-back during their production.

In celebration of the franchise, Deadline co-editor in chief Mike Fleming spoke Wednesday with Frank Price on how he saved Back to the Future from obscurity on its way to the big screen.