The 2015 MTV Video Music Awards snared 9.8 million total viewers across 10 Viacom networks. That’s down from last year’s 10.3M, factoring in simulcasts on MTV, MTV2, VH1, Logo, etc., according to Nielsen stats.

VMA 2015 Video music awardsMTV did not send stats for last night’s premiere of its annual orgy of excess. Last year’s VMAs clocked 8.3 million viewers in its first telecast on MTV on Sunday night, which had been down from previous year’s 10.1 million. Networks typically send stats that show growth.

So, MTV today focused instead on last night’s VMAs being the most tweeted non-sports program since Nielsen Social began tracking Twitter TV activity. Last night’s VMAs generated 21.4 million tweets, which reached 11.8 million people, the Viacom-owned network boasted. Additionally, 16 million people had 39 million Facebook interactions related to the VMAs yesterday. MTV also drew reporters’ attention to the show having generated 19.1 million streams to date, up 155% over the same time period for the 2014 trophy show.

9 months
Very true. Trending on Twitter isn't ratings. Ratings are ratings.
9 months
they sucked no talent anywhere to be found
Cristina Willigs
9 months
she would do everything, except good music

MTV also did not send, so far anyway, stats for all airings across the evening. Last year, those viewing levels hit 13.7 million. Miley Cyrus stole that show — that time without appearing onstage – when she won Video of the Year for “Wrecking Ball. Cyrus sent a young homeless guy named Jesse onstage to accept the award on her behalf/raise awareness for the plight of homeless people in MTV’s demo/direct viewers to Miley’s Facebook page to make donations — while a camera was trained on Miley in the audience, weeping.

For comparison’s sake: In 2013, an estimated 10.1 million people — 4.6 million of them ages 12-34 — watched the twerking of Cyrus and Robin Thicke that headlined that year’s MTV Video Music Awards. That had been a big step up from the previous year’s overall audience of just 6.1 million, but still far short of the 12.4 million who tuned in in 2011 — or the runner-up 11.95 million crowd of 2002.