Alexander, who recently replaced star Larry David in the comedy, will continue with the production for two more weeks than planned, through August 1 at the Cort Theatre. Fish began performances on February 2, boasting the highest advance sale for any play in Broadway history, although the production declined to say how much the advance was or which play’s record it had broken. The extension will be the final one, the producers said.

In other strange news out of New York, Bloomberg Philanthropies, the charitable arm of former mayor Michael Bloomberg’s information-selling empire, announced that four public arts projects across the U.S. have been awarded grants of up to $1 million each. The winning municipalities are Los Angeles; Gary, Ind.; Spartanburg, S.C.; and, jointly, Albany, New York and nearby Schenectady and Troy.

“Great public art strengthens cities by making them more exciting and attractive places to live, work, and visit,” Mr. Bloomberg said in a news release announcing the grants. “Public art can also help us to see urban challenges in a new light –- and imagine new solutions.” Those are themes Bloomberg touted repeatedly as mayor — strange only because Bloomberg News (where I used to work) summarily killed its comprehensive coverage of the arts shortly before Bloomberg returned to run the business he founded after three terms in office.

The temporary projects are to be completed within two years, with the winning cities required to contribute financially as well. More than 230 cities submitted proposals, according to the announcement.