The Imitation Game, which garnered eight Oscar nominations on Thursday, has reached a global box office cume north of $102.3M. That includes an estimated $50.8M in North America through today, and an international estimate of $51.5M, per FilmNation. The current international frame was worth $6.6M with five new territories added including Belgium and Sweden. Among the key markets still to bow are Germany, France, Brazil and Russia.

“This is a wonderful milestone for The Imitation Game,” says producer Teddy Schwarzman of Black Bear Pictures. “We made this independent film for a fraction of a studio budget, and no one involved ever imagined a day like today. It is a testament to our director, Morten Tyldum, screenwriter Graham Moore, our wonderful ensemble cast, and the hardest working crew imaginable, who came together to ensure Alan Turing’s legacy could find a much deserved place in history. Audiences worldwide are now ensuring this becomes a reality.”

Playing on about 1,714 screens internationally this weekend, Imitation Game had strong bows in Belgium ($289K) and Sweden ($332K), outperforming comps Philomena and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy in those respective markets. The film’s biggest ex-U.S. market is the UK where Studiocanal has had it in release for 10 weeks with an estimated cume to date of £15.1M ($23.2M). Studiocanal says progress has been healthy in the awards window with this weekend decoding $293K. Also continuing to perform is Australia where the Benedict Cumberbatch-starrer grossed $1.4M for the weekend, generating a $9.7M cume after three frames. The total exceeds the lifetimes of comps like The Butler, Lincoln, 12 Years A Slave and Philomena. Italy‘s current frame was worth $1.3M for a $6.5M cume after three sessions. FilmNation puts that 25% above The King’s Speech. Other cumes include Spain‘s $2.7M; Norway‘s $2.5M; and the Netherlands‘ $1.09M.

Acquired domestically by The Weinstein Co in a record deal at Berlin last year, the historical drama initially released in the UK after having appeared at scores of festivals beginning with Telluride in August. It’s now got nine BAFTA nominations. Its eight Academy Award mentions include Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Cumberbatch), Best Supporting Actress (Keira Knightley), Adapted Screenplay, Editing, Production Design and Original Score.