The CW describes its midseason apocalyptic drama The Messengers thusly:

When a mysterious object plummets to Earth, the blinding explosion it causes sends out CW Logoa shock wave that instantly connects five strangers who awaken after the pulse with extraordinary gifts they can barely believe. Most mysterious of all is a figure known only as The Man, who brings death and suffering wherever he appears. The wheels of Revelation have begun to turn, and these five newly christened Angels of the Apocalypse may be the only hope for preventing the impending Rapture.

And yet, this afternoon at Winter TV Press Tour, when a TV critic who identified herself as “an American Jew” said she finds the show’s “my way or perish” notion to be “threatening,” and asked, “Is that going to be ameliorated in any way, or what exactly are you saying?” Exec producer Trey Callaway insisted the show is not about religion.

the+messengers+cwCallaway — who identified himself as the Tulsa-born son of a Presbyterian minister who converted to Judaism when he moved to the West Coast because it was the religion he felt most comfortable “hanging my hat” on — said the writers room also included Catholics, agnostics, Buddhists, athiests, etc. The series is relatable, he said, because every one of “the world’s major religions has its own version of End of Days” scenario.

The Messengers, he maintained, is a “show about faith.” He elaborated later, saying it’s about “faith in powers greater than anything you ever imagined.” He thinks the show is just the ticket for people looking for hope in this troubled world.

A couple members of the staff applauded.