Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller returned to Comic-Con with Sin City: A Dame To Kill For, the next month’s sequel to their 2005 graphic novel-based groundbreaker — and already began stumping for a threequel. “Robert and I are already talking about Sin City 3. so you’d better show up to 2,” Miller told the Hall H crowd, with most fans waiting for today’s late-afternoon Marvel presentation.

Related: Hot Trailer: ‘Sin City: A Dame To Kill For’

Frank Miller Comic-Con Sin City 2Not that Comic-Con doesn’t love Sin City. Con-goers first glimpsed the pair’s first film a decade ago. By now they’ve been hearing Rodriguez and Miller talk up their DIY greenscreen process for years. While nobody lost their geek marbles over Saturday’s subdued panel conversation with Rodriguez, Miller, and stars Jessica Alba, Josh Brolin, and Rosario Dawson, it wasn’t until they screened new dazzling footage from the film’s opening sequence and a “montage” teaser reel that Hall H-ers woke up.

forgetting something
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I didn’t know he ever had a beard. Hair on his head, yes. Shows you how long...
WyldeMan52
3 months
That's Frank Miller without his signature beard.
forgetting something
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Who’s that old man in the photo?

Mickey Rourke Sin City A Dame to Kill ForThe original Sin City won the Technical Grand Prize from Cannes when it screened there in 2005, and in the nine years since Rodriguez and Miller have added more crispness to the series’ black-and-white comic book aesthetic. They screened an opening sequence tracking the bloody shenanigans of returning character Marv (Mickey Rourke) in a dynamic swirl of visual effects and voice-over, punctuated by flashes of red. Rodriguez and Miller also trotted out a flashy new montage reel that runs through the pic’s motley cast of characters as mayhem unfolds in Basin City.

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sin city eva green poster (1)The Rodriguez-Miller partnership has been a fruitful one for both artists. “Frank controlled the rights to Sin City” but was wary of the traditional studio process of seeing a movie from script to screen. Enter Rodriguez’s proposal to skirt the studios and do it on their own terms in his DIY studio. Otherwise “he wouldn’t have done it. It was his baby.”