The changes might not surprise those who closely follow the streaming video deals that seem to hit every day, but it’s illuminating to see a statistical measure of the shift in the top providers’ content libraries. That’s what Piper Jaffray analyst Michael Olson served up this week in a look at how Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Plus, and Redbox Instant compare in their offerings of top 50 movies available for streaming over the past three years and top 75 TV shows available from the past four years.

AmazonPrimeInstantVideo__140423194249-575x164Amazon “caught up significantly” to Netflix in TV, Olson says — though both trail Hulu, which is owned by the major broadcast networks. Hulu Plus had 51% of the available hit TV shows in June, up from 44% a year ago. Yet while Netflix had 32%, down 1 percentage point, Amazon increased from 7% to 12%. (Redbox had zero both years.)

The story’s different for movies. Netflix had 12% of the available hits this year, down from 14%. But Amazon dropped from 12% to 6%. Redbox Instant also lost ground, falling to 7% from 10%. Hulu just had 1%, up from zero.

John
5 months
You're kidding. Amazon Prime is stale and can't even compare to Netflix streaming... unless you like paying...
BDCNY
5 months
I marvel at the assessment of the streaming services and how consumers actually use them. Netflix still...
Ian
5 months
The move towards original programming is inevitable, it's just a shame no service will ever manage to...

Also of interest: The study found that Netflix offers nearly half of the hit TV shows that Amazon streams — and all of the hit movies. That “speaks to the quality of Netflix’s selection and difficulty of obtaining exclusive content,” Olson says. But he notes that Netflix’s library of TV shows and movies will “continue to contract as content dollars shift towards originals; a prudent strategy assuming ongoing ability to create hits.”