On Tuesday during his annual address to delegates at CinemaCon, National Association Of Theatre Owners president John Fithian caused a stir with a real head-scratcher that has keptCinemaCon2014_badge resonating among theater owners and some studio executives when he stated he waited to watch this year’s Oscar-winning Best Picture 12 Years A Slave at home, rather than at a cinema, becauseCinemaCon 2014 - The State Of The Industry: Past, Present And Future And Universal Studios Presentation it was too “unequivocally intense.”  For the head of an organization that is meant to promote movie-watching in theaters, singling out the Academy’s choice for Best Picture (with that Oscar distinction traditionally a real magnet to bring customers into theaters) was an eye-opener, and execs at 20th Century Fox to whom I have spoken were furious with the NATO chief for even suggesting, however personal, that the preferred way to see the widely acclaimed Fox Searchlight release was to wait and see it at home. This morning, near the beginning of their studio presentation at Caesars Palace’s Colisseum theatre, Fox shot back. “All of (our) films are meant to be seen in the best possible venue, the cinema, your cinemas and that includes movies that win the Oscar for Best Picture like 12 Years A Slave,” said 20th Century Fox distribution president Chris Aronson in his opening remarks this morning that contained that not-so-veiled reference and response to Fithian’s comments.

Related: CinemaCon: ‘X Men’, Other Women, Lots Of Girls And An Ape Steal Show

12-Years-a-Slave-posterOf course it is no secret that many Academy members were, like Fithian, reluctant to watch the intense film, either in a theater or at home on their screener. That’s one of the reasons Fox Searchlight launched their second-phase “It’s Time” campaign in order to encourage them to view the film that would eventually take the top prize for the studio. But coming from the head of NATO, these remarks really stung, especially since he so publicly supports strict windows between the theatrical release of a movie and when it can be consumed at home. One Fox exec to whom I spoke was, in a word, livid when he heard Fithian’s remarks. Another major theatre chain head who played several runs of 12 Years A Slave and still has it in some theaters (even though it first opened in October) was equally outraged by the suggestion that the film is too intense for their screens. Another said, “It’s like if you were the head of Macy’s department store and urged people to shop in their store, but to buy your underwear online.”

obat infeksi saluran
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5 months
Sebelum anda lanjut ke halaman lain, ada baiknya anda membaca reviews kami terlebih dahulu hehehe
robert thompson
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5 months
This nato guy has been nothing but a total suit all the years he's been there. Guys...
HowardB
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5 months
I'm feeling a strong sense of racism, but not from John Fithian.

20th_century_fox_logoFithian , who didn’t mention any  other kinds of films he finds too intense to watch in a theatre, did praise the film in his remarks which were anything but off the cuff and even included a graphic showing the announcement of nominations for Best Picture. “It was the only movie of the nine nominated for Best Picture that I didn’t watch on the big screen,” he told theater owners whose livelihood depends on getting people to see these movies in theaters. “It’s not that I didn’t consider the movie worthy of watching. Quite the contrary. 12 Years A Slave constitutes one of the most important movies of our generation. It’s simply that, for me,  the movie was too unequivocally intense to watch in a cinema so I waited and watched  it at home.” So far the film has grossed about $175 million in cinemas worldwide, with $56 million domestic and about $5 million since winning the Oscar.

We may not have heard the last of this controversy, even as the convention comes to a close later tonight. More on the Fox presentation coming up.