OSCARS: Original Score Category To Draw From 104 Movies

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences‘ Music Branch members will vote for no more than five of the 104 eligible movies announced today, with the five receiving the most votes becoming the nominations for final voting for the 85th Oscars. To be eligible, the original score must be a substantial body of music that serves as original dramatic underscoring, and must be written specifically for the motion picture by the submitting composer. Scores diluted by the use of tracked themes or other preexisting music, diminished in impact by the predominant use of songs, or assembled from the music of more than one composer shall not be eligible, the Academy said today. Here’s the long list in alphabetical order by title:

“Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,” Henry Jackman, composer
“After the Wizard,” Stephen Main, composer
“Alex Cross,” John Debney and Sebastian Morton, composers
“The Amazing Spider-Man,” James Horner, composer
“Anna Karenina,” Dario Marianelli, composer
“Argo,” Alexandre Desplat, composer
“Battleship,” Steve Jablonsky, composer
“The Bay,” Marcelo Zarvos, composer
“Beasts of the Southern Wild,” Dan Romer and Benh Zeitlin, composers
“Being Flynn,” Damon Gough, composer
“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” Thomas Newman, composer
“Big Miracle,” Cliff Eidelman, composer
“Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story,” David Cieri, composer
“Brave,” Patrick Doyle, composer
“Brooklyn Castle,” B. Satz, composer
“Chasing Ice,” J. Ralph, composer
“Chasing Mavericks,” Chad Fischer, composer
“Chicken with Plums,” Olivier Bernet, composer
“Chimpanzee,” Nicholas Hooper, composer
“Cloud Atlas,” Reinhold Heil and Johnny Klimek, composers
“Compliance,” Heather McIntosh, composer
“Contraband,” Clinton Shorter, composer
“The Dark Knight Rises,” Hans Zimmer, composer
“Dark Shadows,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Darling Companion,” James Newton Howard, composer
“Deadfall,” Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders, composers
“The Dictator,” Erran Baron Cohen, composer
“Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax,” John Powell, composer
“End of Watch,” David Sardy, composer
“Ethel,” Miriam Cutler, composer
“Flight,” Alan Silvestri, composer
“For a Good Time, Call…” John Swihart, composer
“For Greater Glory: The True Story of Cristiada,” James Horner, composer
“Frankenweenie,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Fun Size,” Deborah Lurie, composer
“Girl in Progress,” Christopher Lennertz, composer
“The Grey,” Marc Streitenfeld, composer
“The Guilt Trip,” Christophe Beck, composer
“Hidden Moon,” Luis Bacalov, composer
“Hitchcock,” Danny Elfman, composer
“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” Howard Shore, composer
“Hotel Transylvania,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“House at the End of the Street,” Theo Green, composer
“The Hunger Games,” James Newton Howard, composer
“Hyde Park on Hudson,” Jeremy Sams, composer
“Ice Age Continental Drift,” John Powell, composer
“The Impossible,” Fernando Velázquez, composer
“Jack Reacher,” Joe Kraemer, composer
“John Carter,” Michael Giacchino, composer
“Journey 2: The Mysterious Island,” Andrew Lockington, composer
“Lawless,” Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, composers
“Life of Pi,” Mychael Danna, composer
“Lincoln,” John Williams, composer
“Lola Versus,” Will Bates and Philip Mossman, composers
“Looper,” Nathan Johnson, composer
“The Lucky One,” Mark Isham, composer
“LUV,” Nuno Malo, composer
“The Man with the Iron Fists,” RZA and Howard Drossin, composers
“Marvel’s The Avengers,” Alan Silvestri, composer
“The Master,” Jonny Greenwood, composer
“Men in Black 3,” Danny Elfman, composer
“Middle of Nowhere,” Kathryn Bostic, composer
“Mirror Mirror,” Alan Menken, composer
“The Odd Life of Timothy Green,” Geoff Zanelli, composer
“On the Road,” Gustavo Santaolalla, composer
“The Pardon,” Ashley Irwin, composer
“Parental Guidance,” Marc Shaiman, composer
“People Like Us,” A.R. Rahman, composer
“The Possession,” Anton Sanko, composer
“Prometheus,” Marc Streitenfeld, composer
“Promised Land,” Danny Elfman, composer
“The Raid: Redemption,” Mike Shinoda and Joseph Trapanese, composers
“Red Tails,” Terence Blanchard, composer
“Rise of the Guardians,” Alexandre Desplat, composer
“Ruby Sparks,” Nick Urata, composer
“Safe House,” Ramin Djawadi, composer
“Safety Not Guaranteed,” Ryan Miller, composer
“Saint Dracula,” Sreevalsan J. Menon, composer
“Savages,” Adam Peters, composer
“Seeking a Friend for the End of the World,” Rob Simonsen and Jonathan Sadoff, composers
“The Sessions,” Marco Beltrami, composer
“Sinister,” Christopher Young, composer
“Skyfall,” Thomas Newman, composer
“Smashed,” Eric D. Johnson and Andy Cabic, composers
“Snow White and the Huntsman,” James Newton Howard, composer
“Taken 2,” Nathaniel Mechaly, composer
“Ted,” Walter Murphy, composer
“Think Like a Man,” Christopher Lennertz, composer
“This Means War,” Christophe Beck, composer
“A Thousand Words,” John Debney, composer
“The Three Stooges,” John Debney, composer
“Trashed,” Vangelis, composer
“Trouble with the Curve,” Marco Beltrami, composer
“21 Jump Street,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2,” Carter Burwell, composer
“Until They Are Home,” Jamie Dunlap, composer
“War of the Worlds The True Story,” Jamie Hall, composer
“The Watch,” Christophe Beck, composer
“West of Memphis,” Nick Cave and Warren Ellis, composers
“Where Do We Go Now?” Khaled Mouzanar, composer
“Won’t Back Down,” Marcelo Zarvos, composer
“The Words,” Marcelo Zarvos, composer
“Wreck-It Ralph,” Henry Jackman, composer
“Zero Dark Thirty,” Alexandre Desplat, composer

  1. If only the musical score Oscars that are given out any year bore any relation to the concept of “outstanding musical scoring of the year.” Instead, the score Oscar is usually doled out as a part of a package deal to increase a studio’s haul for its particular winning film. It’s not as if the Academy voters are doing anything but trying to reward the film and its studio (as opposed to rewarding the composer for a job well done, which may occasionally happen to be a score for a film that doesn’t clean up in the major categories).

    The only annual music award worth taking seriously is the Los Angeles Film Critics music award which usually shows evidence of the vote having gone to music that is good music, creative music, and music that serves its particular film very well, whether or not the film has boatloads of other awards/nominations. If you look at a list of their winners since 1975 you will not only see many of the great names of scoring represented, but a huge spectrum of possible types of film music, from traditional orchestral, to jazz, to rock and beyond. This year’s winner was “Beasts of the Southern Wild.”

  2. As always, the oscars are just another marketing tool. If the studio is not interested in pushing the film, the academy bypassers it, no matter how good it may be, or aspects of it. The movie ‘Bel Ami’ is a good example, great costumes and music, but overall, a flop, and therefore dropped by the studio etc.

  3. Really hoping Anna Karenina picks up a nom for this one. Marianelli’s score was perfect and a joy to listen to outside of the film.

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