UK Prime Minister David Cameron said he won’t launch a probe into whether Culture Minister Jeremy Hunt breached the ministerial code of conduct for Hunt’s part in overseeing News Corp’s ultimately failed bid for BSkyB. Hunt has been in the spotlight for his supposed close ties to News Corp’s Rupert Murdoch and son James, which raised eyebrows when he was handed a quasi-judicial role overseeing the $14B bid for the 61% of BSkyB that News Corp didn’t already own. During Hunt’s testimony today before the Leveson Inquiry charged with investigating UK media ethics, it was revealed he texted his congratulations to James Murdoch in December 2010 after News Corp’s bid cleared a regulatory hurdle. “Congratulations on Brussels,” Hunt texted to Murdoch after the European Commission ruled it would not block a deal. “Only Ofcom to go.” Not long after, Hunt was appointed the government overseer of the bid, which was scrapped in July as the phone-hacking scandal at News Corp-owned tabloid News Of The World erupted. Hunt told the inquiry today he would not have sent the text if he had known he was getting the overseer role. After watching Hunt today, Cameron said the Culture Minister acted “properly” throughout the period he was responsible for the bid.

Related: UK Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt To Turn Over Emails, Texts On BSkyB Bid Process

UK shadow culture secretary Harriet Harman said Hunt should never have been given oversight of the merger and criticized Cameron’s decision today. “It is a catalogue of errors and wrongdoing that now David Cameron is going to say it’s fine and we’re going to carry on as usual. It’s not and it’s deplorable,” she said, according to the Guardian.

Steve
3 years
In British newspapers the man is described as 'clinging to his job'. It's a situation without honour...
Jemma
3 years
I watched the testimony today and thought it was very incriminating for Hunt. And frankly, for Osborne...

Related: Ex-News Corp Editor Andy Coulson Charged With Perjury In Scotland