Freelance writer Dominic Patten is a Deadline contributor

UPDATE 4:50 PM: “The judge asked us to come down and speak to the other side,” defense attorney Adam Levin said outside Judge Bendix’s courtroom, “and we did so and absolutely nothing has changed.” Levin said there is no settlement and the case will return to the jury on Monday. Nicollette Sheridan and her lawyer Mark Baute emerged from the judge’s courtroom. Uncharacteristically, the usually media friendly Baute said “No comment.” A few moments later, outside the courtroom, Baute added, “We believe it is 8 to 4 in our favor.” The holdup, he said is that “the foreman is against us.”

Without a settlement, the case continues Monday with the deadlocked jury.

PREVIOUSLY: The jury said it is “hopelessly deadlocked.” They are split 8-4 and Judge Elizabeth Allen White told them just now to take the weekend to think about it and come back Monday. If they can’t come to a verdict, she told them, she’ll have to declare a mistrial. “I know how frustrating this must be,” Judge White said.

PREVIOUSLY: Nicollette Sheridan and ABC may be trying to settle in the actress’ wrongful termination suit against Desperate Housewives producer Marc Cherry and the network. A source close to the case told Deadline that if the 12-person jury could not come to a verdict by 1:30 this afternoon, lawyers Mark Baute for the plaintiff and Adam Levin for the defense, and their teams, will meet in front of judge Helen Bendix. And they’re gathering in Bendix’s courtroom now. Any discussions between the lawyers will happen behind closed doors in Judge Bendix’s chambers.

Mo
2 years
your obviously new in this town
Anon
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Not if they were afraid of reprimands or think it's alright to hit a woman. You are...
Riva Shane
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Making a blanketed asinine statement like "Marc Cherry hates women" is the same as me saying you're...

The jury continued its second day of deliberations today, with no verdict reached so far. Deliberations ended Thursday afternoon when the jury informed trial judge Elizabeth Allen White that it was “having difficulty reaching a verdict.”