UPDATE: If prosecutors decide to charge several people over the allegations surrounding former News of the World journalists, all the defendants would likely be tried at the same time, London’s Telegraph reports today. Because of the parallel police inquiries into phone hacking and police corruption, any trials are likely to be delayed until the spring of 2013 as detectives sift through thousands of documents. And since some of the possible defendants could face trial relating to both inquiries, the media is likely to be banned from reporting any of the evidence in any of the trials until all have been concluded.

EARLIER, AUGUST 19, 12:20 PM: We could hear some important revelations next week in the News Of The World scandal: Private investigator Glenn Mulcaire is expected to disclose by Friday who at the defunct tabloid asked him to hack the phones of six people including model Elle MacPherson, PR agent Max Clifford, and former Professional Footballers Association chief Gordon Taylor. The Telegraph reports that on August 1st Mulcaire lost his appeal of a court order to name names in the six cases — although he’s still fighting a different order to reveal who asked him to hack the phone of comedian Steve Coogan. The disclosure comes a day after Mulcaire sued News Corp for breach of contract: Last month the company stopped paying the legal bills for the PI who was convicted in 2007 of phone hacking.

Meanwhile, Scotland Yard today made its 14th hacking-related arrest: former NOTW reporter Dan Evans. The paper suspended him last year after interior designed Kelly Hoppen named him in a civil suit against the paper.

Police also arrested and suspended a detective who’s believed to have leaked information about its investigation to The Guardian – which has led the pack in its coverage of the scandal. “I made it very clear when I took on this investigation the need for operational and information security,” says Sue Akers who’s leading the hacking probe. “It is hugely disappointing that this may not have been adhered to.” The Guardian would not comment on whether it received the leaks. But it  said that “journalists would no doubt be concerned if conversations between off-the-record sources and reporters came routinely to be regarded as criminal activity.”

Riz
3 years
Blimey. I presumed it was just worst-case but unlikely scenario. If it ever gets to that stage...
Frank
3 years
RICO loves the Big Fish.
Garry
3 years
The Communications Act of 1934 requires the owner to be of good character. News Corp is the...