2ND UPDATE: Hollywood can most likely expect a quick and easy negotiation when the Screen Actors Guild joins with AFTRA to negotiate with the studios and networks starting Monday. It also looks more than likely that SAG will merge with AFTRA soon. That’s because the so-called pro-moderation and pro-merger SAG National Majority — consisting of Unite For Strength (U4S) based in Hollywood and the United Screen Actors Nationwide (USAN) consisting of the NY Division and Regional reps — today strengthened its grip over the big actors union. Usually, those SAG candidates who are also well-known actors fare better in these guild elections. But today’s election results show that rival faction Membership First lost all 13 of its open seats on the 71-member national board, including such well-known incumbents as controversial ex-SAG president Alan Rosenberg, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, Frances Fisher, and Esai Morales. (Harper and Morales are Alternates.)

So, at least among the small percentage of SAG’s 125,000 membership that actually sent in ballots (less than in recent years), this was a clear repudiation of Membership First’s years of pursuing a hardball negotiating strategy against the AMPTP and a hardline stand against SAG merging with AFTRA.

Now U4S, which came to power just 2 years ago, and its national majority coalition have extended their margin of control over SAG’s policy-setting National Board to about 80% of the votes. UFS will also assume control of the Guild’s Hollywood Division Board, with 75% of the votes. Its better-known winning candidates included Ron Perlman, Gabrielle Carteris, Jeff Garlin, Michael O’Keefe for 3-year terms, and DW Moffett with a 1-year term.

Simon
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4 years
Don't pay SAG a dime. It's a waste of money. There's nothing this bunch of clowns can...
Kells
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4 years
Okay, please escuse me if this sounds like a stupid question, but what does all of this...
Thunder Duck
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4 years
Pendalian, Our membership is a perfect distillation of the American people: lazy, unwilling to think critically, unwilling...

“SAG members have spoken decisively and what they’re saying couldn’t be more clear – they voted for merger,” SAG president Ken Howard, a U4S member, said in a U4S-issued statement after election results were announced. “I’m looking forward to working with all the re-elected and newly elected board members, and our partners at AFTRA, to make one union happen.”

U4S leader Ned Vaughn, who remains just an Alternate for the SAG National Board, called it a “landslide affirmation of Unite for Strength’s goal of uniting SAG and AFTRA as a single performers’ union.” He noted that SAG’s Hollywood Division members today elected 13 U4S candidates to serve on the Guild’s National Board of Directors, and another 20 of the group’s candidates to serve on the SAG Hollywood Board. U4S candidates won 33 of the 35 total seats at stake in Hollywood. “All the candidates elected in the Guild’s New York and Regional Branch Divisions also support the move to one union.”

This coming Monday, SAG and AFTRA will begin jointly bargaining their TV/Theatrical Contract with the AMPTP for 7 weeks, followed by the DGA in mid-November. No date has yet been set for the WGA, whose contract ends May 1, 2011, but the moguls and the AMPTP intend to negotiate with the writers last to ensure there’s the most Hollywood pressure on them. At present, SAG/AFTRA and the DGA are trading information, but not with the WGA despite last year’s talk about all the Hollywood guilds cooperating. Both SAG/AFTRA and the DGA have made it their priority to achieve gains in health and pension, and much less so in wages and New Media. This, despite the fact that Big Media just reported bigger profits this past quarter and better forecasts for the rest of 2010 and also 2011.

The major election issue this time around was exactly how actors should be unionized. U4S and USAN are content to join with AFTRA as is and become one union. However, Membership First has long opposed a combined union with AFTRA because the smaller predominantly represents broadcasters and is simple to join. MF believes that instead all actors should belong to one big union.

But MF was demoralized and disorganized during this latest campaign so it’s no surprise it lost further ground. This was also the first SAG election under the non-disparagement gag order with AFTRA. So any open debate was nonexistent. Even the hot button issue of the SAG National Majority standing idly by last spring while AFTRA poached 38 new broadcast scripted TV series for the 2010-2011 season, compared to SAG’s single new show, never received attention.

Hollywood-centric Membership First was in control of the SAG National Board and its AMPTP negotiations starting in 2005 until 2008 when U4S came out of nowhere to join with USAN against what it saw as the “hardline” negotiating stance of Membership First. U4S won a slim majority in the 2008 SAG election but it was enough with USAN to control of SAG. The SAG National Majority then took over the dragging negotiations with the AMPTP, settled quickly, increased its majority in 2009, and added to it even more today.

Membership First’s Anne-Marie Johnson, who ran against U4S’s Ken Howard for SAG president a year ago and lost, said, “We still believe in the long run that our positions are going to be proven. But we all have to acknowledge that our message no longer resonated with the members. We wish the winners well. The ball is clearly in their court.”

Here’s the SAG announcement:

Los Angeles (September 23, 2010)—Screen Actors Guild today announced elections results for the Guild’s National Board of Directors. Twenty-seven (27) of the 69 National Board seats were open for election this year, representing Screen Actors Guild’s Hollywood, New York and Regional Branch Divisions. The newly elected National Board members will assume office on September 25. SAG’s Hollywood Division elected thirteen new National Board members; the New York Division elected five members; and nine National Board members were elected from the union’s Branches in Arizona, Chicago, Florida, Georgia, Houston, New Mexico, San Francisco, Seattle and Utah.

National Board members elected from the Hollywood Division (top 11 – three-year terms, next 2 – one-year terms): Ron Perlman, Jason George, Gabrielle Carteris, Jeff Garlin, Clyde Kusatsu, Marisol Nichols, Marcia Strassman, Jenny O’Hara, Dawnn Lewis, Clark Gregg, Michael O’Keefe, L. Scott Caldwell, and D. W. Moffett.

The following were elected to serve as National Board alternates and to the Hollywood Division Board of Directors (all one-year terms). Sam Jaeger, Michael O’Neill, Bill Smitrovich, Ned Vaughn, Christine Lakin, Woody Schultz, Mimi Cozzens, Tara Radcliffe, Patrick Fabian, Donal Logue, Stacey Travis, Esai Morales, Ellen Crawford, Assaf Cohen, Mandy Steckelberg, Conrad E. Palmisano, Michelle Allsopp, Jon Huertas, Valerie Harper, Gilles Marini, Sarayu Rao, and Bertila Damas.

National Board members elected from the New York Division (all three-year terms): Nancy Giles, Richard Masur, Maureen Donnelly, Sue-Anne Morrow, and Mike Hodge.

The following were elected to serve as National Board alternates and to the New York Division Board of Directors (all one-year terms). Manny Alfaro, Justin Barrett, Marc Baron, Jay Potter, Kevin Scullin, John Rothman, Joe Narciso, Dave Bachman, and Andrew Dolan.

National Board members elected from the Regional Branch Division: Steven A. Fried (Arizona – three-year term), Todd Hissong (Chicago – three-year term), Nancy Duerr (Florida – three-year term), Debra Nelson (Georgia – three-year term), Robert Nelson (Houston – one-year term), Roy Costley (New Mexico – three-year term), Tom Chantler (San Francisco – three-year term), Abby Dylan (Seattle – three-year term) and Anne Sward (Utah – three-year term).

Ballots for all eligible SAG members in Hollywood and New York were mailed on August 24 with a September 23 return deadline and were tabulated today by the independent election company Integrity Voting Systems. A total of 12,211 ballots were tabulated in the Hollywood Division (representing 22.39% percent of ballots mailed in the Hollywood Division) and 4,445 ballots were tabulated in the New York Division (representing 19.66 percent of ballots mailed in the New York Division). The number of ballots returned in the Regional Branch elections varied by region.